In South Korea’s Olympic hills, traces of the North abound

Southwest Life

In South Korea’s Olympic hills, traces of the North abound

Artist Doyu, 48, performs at the Goseong Unification Observatory as part of an art festival in Goseong, South Korea. “I’d like to express a bird who wants to fly wherever it wants without having any boundary,” said the performer. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Visitors use binoculars to view North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Lee Dookyun, 75, whose sister lives in North Korea, gets emotional while viewing North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
People view North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea, Monday. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Park Range, 45, leans on a rail while viewing North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Surrounded by pine trees, visitors tour the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Visitors stand outside the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Visitors tour the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
A window is left open in a room overlooking Hwajinpo Beach at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
A visitor walks past a poster showing a childhood picture of Kim Jong Il taken when he was six at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Heo Suyeon, 25, tours the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Yeum Sang Bae, an instructor at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, stands outside the villa at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Two boys look through binoculars on the rooftop of the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
A metal sign in Korean points to a spot where late North Korea leader Kim Jong Il took a photo with sister, Kim Kyong-hui, when he was six at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Hong Sun Kee, a 47-year-old office worker, talks with reporters next to a North Korean submarine on display at the seaside “Unification Park” in Gangneung, South Korea, where the Olympics’ skating, hockey and curling events are held. Hong said he was a reservist who was mobilized for the 1996 manhunt for the North Korean crew that fled the submarine after it ran aground during an espionage mission in the area.
Visitors board a North Korean submarine on display at the seaside “Unification Park” in Gangneung, South Korea, where the Olympics’ skating, hockey and curling events are held. The submarine ran aground during a 1996 espionage mission. The crew members abandoned the vessel and went into nearby rugged, heavily wooded mountains triggering a manhunt by South Korean authorities.
Visitors walk inside a North Korean submarine which is on display at the seaside “Unification Park” in Gangneung, South Korea, where the Olympics’ skating, hockey and curling events are held. This 35-meter submarine ran aground in 1996 during an espionage mission in the area. Its 26 crew members abandoned the vessel and went into nearby rugged, heavily wooded mountains.

In South Korea’s Olympic hills, traces of the North abound

Artist Doyu, 48, performs at the Goseong Unification Observatory as part of an art festival in Goseong, South Korea. “I’d like to express a bird who wants to fly wherever it wants without having any boundary,” said the performer. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Visitors use binoculars to view North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Lee Dookyun, 75, whose sister lives in North Korea, gets emotional while viewing North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
People view North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea, Monday. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Park Range, 45, leans on a rail while viewing North Korea from the Goseong Unification Observatory in Goseong, South Korea. Located just south of the DMZ, the observatory is one of northernmost points in South Korea where civilians can travel to have a glimpse into North Korea.
Surrounded by pine trees, visitors tour the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Visitors stand outside the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Visitors tour the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
A window is left open in a room overlooking Hwajinpo Beach at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
A visitor walks past a poster showing a childhood picture of Kim Jong Il taken when he was six at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Heo Suyeon, 25, tours the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Yeum Sang Bae, an instructor at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, stands outside the villa at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wound up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Two boys look through binoculars on the rooftop of the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
A metal sign in Korean points to a spot where late North Korea leader Kim Jong Il took a photo with sister, Kim Kyong-hui, when he was six at the villa known as Hwajinpo Castle, once a holiday home for late North Korea founder Kim Il Sung, at Hwajinpo Beach, South Korea. The villa belonged to a North Korean territory before the 1950-53 War, but it wounded up in South Korea after a borderline was slightly redrawn after the war’s end.
Hong Sun Kee, a 47-year-old office worker, talks with reporters next to a North Korean submarine on display at the seaside “Unification Park” in Gangneung, South Korea, where the Olympics’ skating, hockey and curling events are held. Hong said he was a reservist who was mobilized for the 1996 manhunt for the North Korean crew that fled the submarine after it ran aground during an espionage mission in the area.
Visitors board a North Korean submarine on display at the seaside “Unification Park” in Gangneung, South Korea, where the Olympics’ skating, hockey and curling events are held. The submarine ran aground during a 1996 espionage mission. The crew members abandoned the vessel and went into nearby rugged, heavily wooded mountains triggering a manhunt by South Korean authorities.
Visitors walk inside a North Korean submarine which is on display at the seaside “Unification Park” in Gangneung, South Korea, where the Olympics’ skating, hockey and curling events are held. This 35-meter submarine ran aground in 1996 during an espionage mission in the area. Its 26 crew members abandoned the vessel and went into nearby rugged, heavily wooded mountains.

In South Korea’s Olympic hills, traces of the North abound

Visitors board a North Korean submarine on display at the seaside “Unification Park” in Gangneung, South Korea, where the Olympics’ skating, hockey and curling events are held. The submarine ran aground during a 1996 espionage mission. The crew members abandoned the vessel and went into nearby rugged, heavily wooded mountains triggering a manhunt by South Korean authorities.
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