Report: Inequality remains 50 years after Kerner Report

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Report: Inequality remains 50 years after Kerner Report

Remaining commission member haunted that recommendations never adopted
In this July 24, 1967 photo, police check buildings along a section of 12th Street, about three miles from downtown Detroit, after racial riots which broke out in the city. Many businesses and homes were burned and looted. Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission, says he remains haunted that the panel’s recommendations on U.S. race relations and poverty were never adopted, but he is hopeful they will be one day.
In this July 15, 1967 photo, a National Guard officer passes the smashed window of a black-owned flower shop in riot-torn Newark, N.J., after a night of looting and violence. The small sign in window reads, “Please!! Negro-Owned Business.” Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission, says he remains haunted that the panel’s recommendations on U.S. race relations and poverty were never adopted, but he is hopeful they will be one day. He strongly feels that poverty and structural racism still inflame racial tensions even as the United States becomes more diverse.
Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, of Oklahoma, holds a copy of “The Kerner Report,” at his home in Corrales, N.M., on Aug. 31, 2017, as he discusses the 50th anniversary of the Kerner Commission, a panel appointed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1967 to examine the causes of the 1960s riots. Harris is the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission and he says he remains haunted that its recommendations on U.S. race relations and poverty were never adopted.
Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, of Oklahoma, at his home in Corrales, N.M., on Feb. 19, discusses his role as a member of the landmark 1968 Kerner Report looking into the urban riots of the late 1960s. A new study examining the nation 50 years after the release of the report says barriers to equality are posing threats to democracy in the U.S. as the country remains segregated along racial lines and child poverty worsens.

Report: Inequality remains 50 years after Kerner Report

In this July 24, 1967 photo, police check buildings along a section of 12th Street, about three miles from downtown Detroit, after racial riots which broke out in the city. Many businesses and homes were burned and looted. Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission, says he remains haunted that the panel’s recommendations on U.S. race relations and poverty were never adopted, but he is hopeful they will be one day.
In this July 15, 1967 photo, a National Guard officer passes the smashed window of a black-owned flower shop in riot-torn Newark, N.J., after a night of looting and violence. The small sign in window reads, “Please!! Negro-Owned Business.” Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission, says he remains haunted that the panel’s recommendations on U.S. race relations and poverty were never adopted, but he is hopeful they will be one day. He strongly feels that poverty and structural racism still inflame racial tensions even as the United States becomes more diverse.
Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, of Oklahoma, holds a copy of “The Kerner Report,” at his home in Corrales, N.M., on Aug. 31, 2017, as he discusses the 50th anniversary of the Kerner Commission, a panel appointed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1967 to examine the causes of the 1960s riots. Harris is the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission and he says he remains haunted that its recommendations on U.S. race relations and poverty were never adopted.
Former U.S. Sen. Fred Harris, of Oklahoma, at his home in Corrales, N.M., on Feb. 19, discusses his role as a member of the landmark 1968 Kerner Report looking into the urban riots of the late 1960s. A new study examining the nation 50 years after the release of the report says barriers to equality are posing threats to democracy in the U.S. as the country remains segregated along racial lines and child poverty worsens.
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