Today’s volunteers ensure yesterday’s slavery is remembered

Southwest Life

Today’s volunteers ensure yesterday’s slavery is remembered

A document dated July 12, 1867, titled “Address presented to William Lloyd Garrison,” is part of the Boston Public Library’s collection of 19th century anti-slavery documents. The library recruited an army of volunteers to help transcribe about 12,000 pieces of correspondence written by some of the most prominent New England abolitionists of the era.

Today’s volunteers ensure yesterday’s slavery is remembered

A document dated July 12, 1867, titled “Address presented to William Lloyd Garrison,” is part of the Boston Public Library’s collection of 19th century anti-slavery documents. The library recruited an army of volunteers to help transcribe about 12,000 pieces of correspondence written by some of the most prominent New England abolitionists of the era.

Today’s volunteers ensure yesterday’s slavery is remembered

Boston Public Library via AP T

A letter from Arthur Tappan of New York to abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, dated Jan. 21, 1832. The letter is part of the Boston Public Library’s collection of 19th century anti-slavery documents. The library recruited an army of volunteers to help transcribe about 12,000 pieces of correspondence written by some of the most prominent New England abolitionists of the era.
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