Sept. 11 costs haunt U.S. economy

Sept. 11 costs haunt U.S. economy

Most visible toll is in security at airports, business, office complexes
It took just a few hours for the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center to destroy a symbol of U.S. capitalism. A decade later, the financial damage still ripples through the economy, as businesses, consumers and the government continue to pay terrorism’s toll. The most visible costs can be seen in the heightened security at airports, government buildings and office complexes.
Detective Todd Sessa keeps his eye on commuters entering and exiting the subway system at Grand Central Station in New York as part of “Operation TORCH,” or Transit Operational Response with Canine and Heavy Weapons, funded by a grant from the Department of Homeland Security to New York, Connecticut and New Jersey. Increased security for mass transit is just one of the many costs of business stemming from the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States.

Sept. 11 costs haunt U.S. economy

FILE
It took just a few hours for the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center to destroy a symbol of U.S. capitalism. A decade later, the financial damage still ripples through the economy, as businesses, consumers and the government continue to pay terrorism’s toll. The most visible costs can be seen in the heightened security at airports, government buildings and office complexes.
FILE
Detective Todd Sessa keeps his eye on commuters entering and exiting the subway system at Grand Central Station in New York as part of “Operation TORCH,” or Transit Operational Response with Canine and Heavy Weapons, funded by a grant from the Department of Homeland Security to New York, Connecticut and New Jersey. Increased security for mass transit is just one of the many costs of business stemming from the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States.
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