Protecting Native American artifacts at Lake Nighthorse

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Protecting Native American artifacts at Lake Nighthorse

Recreation brings the threat of looting, vandalism
Ethan Scott, lands and recreation manager for the Bureau of Reclamation, holds a sign that will be placed around Lake Nighthorse to inform visitors to be respectful of the Native American cultural history that surrounds the reservoir.
The city of Durango will open Lake Nighthorse to recreation on April 1. To protect historic Native American artifacts, visitors will not able to go more than 25 feet up from the reservoir’s high-water mark.

Protecting Native American artifacts at Lake Nighthorse

Ethan Scott, lands and recreation manager for the Bureau of Reclamation, holds a sign that will be placed around Lake Nighthorse to inform visitors to be respectful of the Native American cultural history that surrounds the reservoir.
The city of Durango will open Lake Nighthorse to recreation on April 1. To protect historic Native American artifacts, visitors will not able to go more than 25 feet up from the reservoir’s high-water mark.

Protecting Native American artifacts at Lake Nighthorse

A Bureau of Reclamation report says there are more than 130 known sites around the lake the agency deems sensitive to recreation impacts.

Protecting Native American artifacts at Lake Nighthorse

The city of Durango will open Lake Nighthorse to recreation on April 1. To protect historic Native American artifacts, visitors will not allowed to go more than 25 feet up from the reservoir’s high-water mark.

Protecting Native American artifacts at Lake Nighthorse

Zane Westbrook, left, and Jesse Westbrook, both with F+M Construction, work at the site of the overflow parking area at Lake Nighthorse.
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