The art and craft of making a successful request

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The art and craft of making a successful request

How to make a successful request

Col and Rose become empowered by the tool of making requests and approach us with their desire to replace our homemade, unscented deer tallow soap in the bathroom with store-bought liquid soap.
Requests are clear and specific. Instead of saying, “Can we start using a nice soap in the bathroom?” they might say, “Would you be willing to buy liquid soap for our bathroom when you go shopping on Sunday?”
Requests express what you want, not what you don’t want. Instead of, “Will you please stop putting deer tallow soap in the bathroom?” they might say, “Can we replace the bar soap with liquid soap?”
Requests are more enjoyable to meet when we know how it will contribute to others’ happiness. “That liquid soap seems more sanitary, easier to use and doesn’t crumble into pieces as it wears down, and we think it looks better when we have friends over.”
Requests are doable. A successful request won’t compromise anyone’s values, and usually doesn’t contain the words “never” or “always.”
Unlike a demand, a request maintains everyone’s dignity by allowing for the option to say no or for negotiations. I don’t like the idea of recycling plastic liquid soap containers regularly, so in agreeing to use liquid soap, I want to know that the kids will help me refill reusable containers with bulk liquid soap.
Rachel Turiel

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