Reining in mustang population

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Reining in mustang population

Contraceptive vaccine touted as alternative to helicopter roundups
A 2-year-old colt, in a group with two other bachelors, grazes close to a family band, seen in the background, in early March. There are about a dozen bands in Spring Creek Basin.
The Cattoor Livestock helicopter pilot pens a band of pintos during the 2007 Spring Creek Basin roundup. The horses are run into Spring Creek canyon, and near the pens, a domestic “Judas horse” is released to lead the mustangs into the trap.
A mare, right, and her yearling colt show their bond in Spring Creek Basin. Wild horses develop close family bonds, which affect all facets of their behavior.
If you go

A mustang advocacy group and the Bureau of Land Management have scheduled informational and opinion-gathering meetings this month about the planned roundup in September of wild horses in Spring Creek Basin north of Dove Creek.
b On Wednesday, TJ Holmes, who is president of the Colorado chapter of the National Mustang Association and documents the Spring Creek Basin herd, will talk about the upcoming roundup by helicopter, adoption of mustangs and the benefits of PZP to humanely limit the herd’s reproduction.
Holmes, a copy editor at The Durango Herald, will speak and answer questions from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Animas Room at the La Plata County Fairgrounds, 2500 Main Ave. in Durango.
More information about the mustangs of Spring Creek Basin can be found at Holmes’ blog, updated after weekly visits to the mustangs: http://springcreek wild.wordpress.com.
b On April 25, the Bureau of Land Management, which is responsible for management of wild horse herds, has scheduled a public hearing and open house at the Dolores Public Lands Office, 29211 Highway 184 in Dolores.
The hearing, during which comments will be recorded, is scheduled from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. and is limited to discussion of using helicopters and motorized vehicles for the planned September roundup.
The open house immediately afterward will address issues, such as fertility control, to be included in an environmental assessment required by the National Environmental Policy Act. BLM officials will answer questions and hear comments from the public.
Suggestions from the public will not be recorded. Written comments may be left on forms available there or may be mailed or emailed until May 12.
Mailed comments should be sent to Tom Rice, associate field manager, Dolores Public Lands Office, 29211 Highway 184, Dolores, CO 81323. Emails should be directed to trice@blm.gov.

Reining in mustang population

A 2-year-old colt, in a group with two other bachelors, grazes close to a family band, seen in the background, in early March. There are about a dozen bands in Spring Creek Basin.
The Cattoor Livestock helicopter pilot pens a band of pintos during the 2007 Spring Creek Basin roundup. The horses are run into Spring Creek canyon, and near the pens, a domestic “Judas horse” is released to lead the mustangs into the trap.
A mare, right, and her yearling colt show their bond in Spring Creek Basin. Wild horses develop close family bonds, which affect all facets of their behavior.
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