Backcountry skiing thrives in New England

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Backcountry skiing thrives in New England

Thousands turn out for spring ascents, descents
Andrew Drummond, below, and Drew Zimber ski through the glades on Crescent Ridge in the Randolph Community Forest in Randolph, N.H. In the summer of 2017, Granite Backcountry Alliance recruited 75 volunteers to clear brush and thin trees to create a 75-acre glade on a hillside north of the Presidential Range.
Drew Zimber “skins” uphill using backcountry skis with climbing skins attached to the base, on Crescent Ridge in the Randolph Community Forest in Randolph, New Hampshire. Ski boots pivot in a front binding for the ascent. Skiers remove the skins and lock their heels down in the rear binding for the descent.
Andrew Drummond, below, and Drew Zimber ski through the glades on Crescent Ridge in the Randolph Community Forest in Randolph, New Hampshire. In the summer of 2017, Granite Backcountry Alliance recruited 75 volunteers to clear brush and thin trees to create a 75-acre glade on a hillside north of the Presidential Range.
A skier drops below the ice-covered headwall of Tuckerman Ravine on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington. Thrill-seeking skiers flock to Tuckerman Ravine each spring.
Skiers gather in the bowl of Tuckerman Ravine on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington. With the increase in the popularity of the sport, organizations like Granite Backcountry Alliance are reviving old trails and developing new areas in New Hampshire and western Maine.
Greg George, of Macon, Ga., skis the Lobster Claw, a steep ski route in Tuckerman Ravine on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington. Skiers have been hiking up to ski the Northeast’s tallest peak for nearly 100 years.
Tyler Ray, left, and Drew Zimber discuss plans to revive an abandoned ski trail that will link up with a network of glades on Bartlett Mountain in Bartlett, N.H. The low-impact cut will preserve the tree canopy; the trails will not be visible from the road.

Backcountry skiing thrives in New England

Andrew Drummond, below, and Drew Zimber ski through the glades on Crescent Ridge in the Randolph Community Forest in Randolph, N.H. In the summer of 2017, Granite Backcountry Alliance recruited 75 volunteers to clear brush and thin trees to create a 75-acre glade on a hillside north of the Presidential Range.
Drew Zimber “skins” uphill using backcountry skis with climbing skins attached to the base, on Crescent Ridge in the Randolph Community Forest in Randolph, New Hampshire. Ski boots pivot in a front binding for the ascent. Skiers remove the skins and lock their heels down in the rear binding for the descent.
Andrew Drummond, below, and Drew Zimber ski through the glades on Crescent Ridge in the Randolph Community Forest in Randolph, New Hampshire. In the summer of 2017, Granite Backcountry Alliance recruited 75 volunteers to clear brush and thin trees to create a 75-acre glade on a hillside north of the Presidential Range.
A skier drops below the ice-covered headwall of Tuckerman Ravine on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington. Thrill-seeking skiers flock to Tuckerman Ravine each spring.
Skiers gather in the bowl of Tuckerman Ravine on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington. With the increase in the popularity of the sport, organizations like Granite Backcountry Alliance are reviving old trails and developing new areas in New Hampshire and western Maine.
Greg George, of Macon, Ga., skis the Lobster Claw, a steep ski route in Tuckerman Ravine on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington. Skiers have been hiking up to ski the Northeast’s tallest peak for nearly 100 years.
Tyler Ray, left, and Drew Zimber discuss plans to revive an abandoned ski trail that will link up with a network of glades on Bartlett Mountain in Bartlett, N.H. The low-impact cut will preserve the tree canopy; the trails will not be visible from the road.

Backcountry skiing thrives in New England

Drew Zimber skis through the Randolph Community Forest, north of the Mounts Madison and Adams, in background, in Randolph, New Hampshire.

Backcountry skiing thrives in New England

Andrew Drummond “sends” a large rock while skiing in the glades on Crescent Ridge in the Randolph Community Forest in Randolph, N.H.

Backcountry skiing thrives in New England

The snow-covered slopes of Mount Washington catch the first light of dawn about 18 miles north of North Conway, N.H. The 6,288-foot peak is considered to be the epicenter of backcountry skiing in the Northeast.
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