California beach town’s shift to marijuana creates a stink

Southwest Life

California beach town’s shift to marijuana creates a stink

Workers work in a greenhouse growing cannabis plants at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Carpinteria, about 85 miles northwest of Los Angeles, is located on the bottom of Santa Barbara County, a tourist area famous for its beaches, wine and temperate climate. It’s also gaining notoriety as a haven for cannabis growers.
A group of students play outside the Howard School in Carpinteria, Calif. The school is located near a cannabis farm. Marijuana has become the new crop of choice in a place that once helped fuel the U.S. cut flower industry.
A worker drives a cart past cannabis plants in a greenhouse at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Santa Barbara county amassed the largest number of marijuana cultivation licenses in California since broad legalization arrived on Jan. 1, nearly 800, according to state data compiled by The Associated Press.
Mature cannabis plants are seen in a greenhouse at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Santa Barbara County amassed the largest number of marijuana cultivation licenses in California since broad legalization arrived on Jan. 1, nearly 800, according to state data compiled by The Associated Press. Two-thirds of them come from Carpinteria and Lompoc, a larger agricultural city about an hour’s drive to the northwest.
A worker walks into a greenhouse growing cannabis plants at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Greenhouses that once produced flowers are seen as ideal for growing marijuana. In a climate like Carpinteria’s, they heat and cool easily and inexpensively, and the plants thrive. It takes only about three months to grow cannabis in pots of shredded coconut husks, so farmers can get multiple harvests each year.
A man buys locally grown flowers at a farmers’ market in Carpinteria, Calif. Residents of Carpinteria say they feel lucky to live in what they consider a slice of paradise. But lately, they say, it stinks. That sentiment is the result of a major shift in and around the tight-knit community of 14,000. Marijuana has become the new crop of choice in a place that once helped fuel the U.S. cut flower industry.

California beach town’s shift to marijuana creates a stink

Workers work in a greenhouse growing cannabis plants at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Carpinteria, about 85 miles northwest of Los Angeles, is located on the bottom of Santa Barbara County, a tourist area famous for its beaches, wine and temperate climate. It’s also gaining notoriety as a haven for cannabis growers.
A group of students play outside the Howard School in Carpinteria, Calif. The school is located near a cannabis farm. Marijuana has become the new crop of choice in a place that once helped fuel the U.S. cut flower industry.
A worker drives a cart past cannabis plants in a greenhouse at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Santa Barbara county amassed the largest number of marijuana cultivation licenses in California since broad legalization arrived on Jan. 1, nearly 800, according to state data compiled by The Associated Press.
Mature cannabis plants are seen in a greenhouse at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Santa Barbara County amassed the largest number of marijuana cultivation licenses in California since broad legalization arrived on Jan. 1, nearly 800, according to state data compiled by The Associated Press. Two-thirds of them come from Carpinteria and Lompoc, a larger agricultural city about an hour’s drive to the northwest.
A worker walks into a greenhouse growing cannabis plants at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Greenhouses that once produced flowers are seen as ideal for growing marijuana. In a climate like Carpinteria’s, they heat and cool easily and inexpensively, and the plants thrive. It takes only about three months to grow cannabis in pots of shredded coconut husks, so farmers can get multiple harvests each year.
A man buys locally grown flowers at a farmers’ market in Carpinteria, Calif. Residents of Carpinteria say they feel lucky to live in what they consider a slice of paradise. But lately, they say, it stinks. That sentiment is the result of a major shift in and around the tight-knit community of 14,000. Marijuana has become the new crop of choice in a place that once helped fuel the U.S. cut flower industry.

California beach town’s shift to marijuana creates a stink

Xave Saragosa pauses for photos in his backyard as greenhouses growing cannabis plants are visible in the background, in Carpinteria, Calif. “We don’t want a marijuana smell,” said Saragosa, a 73-year-old retired sheriff’s deputy who was born and raised in the town and lives near a greenhouse that grows marijuana. “We want fresh air.”

California beach town’s shift to marijuana creates a stink

Three boys stroll along the beach in Carpinteria, Calif. Carpinteria, about 85 miles northwest of Los Angeles, is located on the bottom of Santa Barbara County, a tourist area famous for its beaches, wine and temperate climate. It’s also gaining notoriety as a haven for cannabis growers.

California beach town’s shift to marijuana creates a stink

Visitors walk past a mural on their way to a farmers’ market in Carpinteria, Calif.

California beach town’s shift to marijuana creates a stink

A worker picks unnecessary leaves from cannabis plants at Glass House Farms in Carpinteria, Calif. Greenhouses that once produced flowers are seen as ideal for growing marijuana. In a climate like Carpinteria’s, they heat and cool easily and inexpensively, and the plants thrive. It takes only about three months to grow cannabis in pots of shredded coconut husks, so farmers can get multiple harvests each year.
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