Plaque shows landmark status for civil rights leaders’ home

Southwest Life

Plaque shows landmark status for civil rights leaders’ home

The National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque, unseen, showing the Jackson, Miss., home of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, as a national historic landmark, Thursday. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Reena Evers-Everett, daughter of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, delivers reflections on behalf of her family before the National Park Service presented a bronze plaque, right, showing the Jackson, Miss., Evers’ home as a national historic landmark Thursday. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Minnie White Watson, curator of the Medgar and Myrlie Evers house in Jackson, Miss., left, tells Bill Justice superintendent of the Vicksburg National Military Park, right, and U.S. National Park Service Ranger Scott Babinowich, center, about the various times when the house was shot at Thursday in Jackson, Miss. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home. The National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque showing the home of the civil rights leaders as a national historic landmark.
Bill Justice, superintendent of the Vicksburg National Military Park, representing the U.S. National Park Service, presents the bronze plaque as a national historic landmark, right, at the Jackson, Miss., home of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Reena Evers-Everett, daughter of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, delivers reflections on behalf of her family before the National Park Service presented a bronze plaque, unseen, showing the Jackson, Miss., Evers’ home as a national historic landmark. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Charles Evers doffs his hat as an invocation is given during the National Historic Landmark dedication of the Jackson, Miss., home of his brother civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Charles Evers, right, watches as people mill around the front yard of the Jackson, Miss., home of his brother, the late civil rights leader Medgar Evers, after the National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque, center, showing the Jackson, Miss., home as a national historic landmark As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Family photographs decorate the master bedroom in the Jackson, Miss., home of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, where the National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque showing the house as a national historic landmark.

Plaque shows landmark status for civil rights leaders’ home

The National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque, unseen, showing the Jackson, Miss., home of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, as a national historic landmark, Thursday. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Reena Evers-Everett, daughter of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, delivers reflections on behalf of her family before the National Park Service presented a bronze plaque, right, showing the Jackson, Miss., Evers’ home as a national historic landmark Thursday. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Minnie White Watson, curator of the Medgar and Myrlie Evers house in Jackson, Miss., left, tells Bill Justice superintendent of the Vicksburg National Military Park, right, and U.S. National Park Service Ranger Scott Babinowich, center, about the various times when the house was shot at Thursday in Jackson, Miss. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home. The National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque showing the home of the civil rights leaders as a national historic landmark.
Bill Justice, superintendent of the Vicksburg National Military Park, representing the U.S. National Park Service, presents the bronze plaque as a national historic landmark, right, at the Jackson, Miss., home of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Reena Evers-Everett, daughter of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, delivers reflections on behalf of her family before the National Park Service presented a bronze plaque, unseen, showing the Jackson, Miss., Evers’ home as a national historic landmark. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Charles Evers doffs his hat as an invocation is given during the National Historic Landmark dedication of the Jackson, Miss., home of his brother civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers. As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Charles Evers, right, watches as people mill around the front yard of the Jackson, Miss., home of his brother, the late civil rights leader Medgar Evers, after the National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque, center, showing the Jackson, Miss., home as a national historic landmark As the Mississippi NAACP’s first field secretary beginning in 1954, Medgar Evers led voter registration drives and boycotts to push for racial equality. He was assassinated in June 1963 outside the family’s modest ranch-style home.
Family photographs decorate the master bedroom in the Jackson, Miss., home of civil rights leaders Medgar and Myrlie Evers, where the National Park Service unveiled a bronze plaque showing the house as a national historic landmark.
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