No rain in sight: Fire fears force land closures in Arizona

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No rain in sight: Fire fears force land closures in Arizona

A sign posted at a trail leading into the national forest in Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday tells the public no one is allowed in. Multiple areas of national forests around Arizona are closed because of extreme fire danger.
Los Angeles residents John and Pauline Barba tidy up their campsite in Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. The charcoal grills were off-limits because of extreme fire danger, and portions of the nearby national forest closed.
John Dobson combs through his belongings from a site in the national forest outside Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Dobson left the campsite because the area is closed to the public, part of multiple closures of national forest land around Arizona due to extreme fire danger.
John Dobson leaves a note for the U.S. Forest Service at a site where he’s been camping for a year outside Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Multiple areas of national forest land around Arizona are closed because of extreme fire danger.
John Dobson, center, gets help from two U.S. Forest Service employees to remove his personal belongings from his makeshift campsite in the forest surrounding Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Multiple areas of national forests are closed around Arizona because of extreme fire danger.
Matt Engbring, a fire prevention officer with the U.S. Forest Service, checks on signs that alert the public to closures in parts of the national forest surrounding Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday.
Matt Engbring, a fire prevention officer with the U.S. Forest Service, checks on signs that alert the public to closures in parts of the national forest surrounding Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Many parts of the West are dealing with drought, but nowhere else has more state and federal land been closed to recreation than in Arizona where conditions are ripe for large-scale wildfires.
These photos taken Thursday show signs posted at trails leading into the national forest in Flagstaff, Ariz., telling the public no one is allowed in. Multiple areas of national forests around Arizona are closed because of extreme fire danger. The partial closures in a handful of Arizona’s national forests represent a small percentage of the land overall. But they’re putting a damper on camping, hiking, fishing and mountain biking in popular recreation areas.

No rain in sight: Fire fears force land closures in Arizona

A sign posted at a trail leading into the national forest in Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday tells the public no one is allowed in. Multiple areas of national forests around Arizona are closed because of extreme fire danger.
Los Angeles residents John and Pauline Barba tidy up their campsite in Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. The charcoal grills were off-limits because of extreme fire danger, and portions of the nearby national forest closed.
John Dobson combs through his belongings from a site in the national forest outside Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Dobson left the campsite because the area is closed to the public, part of multiple closures of national forest land around Arizona due to extreme fire danger.
John Dobson leaves a note for the U.S. Forest Service at a site where he’s been camping for a year outside Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Multiple areas of national forest land around Arizona are closed because of extreme fire danger.
John Dobson, center, gets help from two U.S. Forest Service employees to remove his personal belongings from his makeshift campsite in the forest surrounding Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Multiple areas of national forests are closed around Arizona because of extreme fire danger.
Matt Engbring, a fire prevention officer with the U.S. Forest Service, checks on signs that alert the public to closures in parts of the national forest surrounding Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday.
Matt Engbring, a fire prevention officer with the U.S. Forest Service, checks on signs that alert the public to closures in parts of the national forest surrounding Flagstaff, Ariz., on Thursday. Many parts of the West are dealing with drought, but nowhere else has more state and federal land been closed to recreation than in Arizona where conditions are ripe for large-scale wildfires.
These photos taken Thursday show signs posted at trails leading into the national forest in Flagstaff, Ariz., telling the public no one is allowed in. Multiple areas of national forests around Arizona are closed because of extreme fire danger. The partial closures in a handful of Arizona’s national forests represent a small percentage of the land overall. But they’re putting a damper on camping, hiking, fishing and mountain biking in popular recreation areas.