From snipers to moms: World War II exhibit focuses on women

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From snipers to moms: World War II exhibit focuses on women

Sue Wilkins, director of education at The International Museum of World War II, in Natick, Mass., stands near a 1933 propaganda poster, right, that praised the Nazi organization German Labor Front, which was created after the Nazis eliminated trade unions. A mannequin, center, displays a uniform of the Nazi Lebensborn program, designed to be worn by women bearing children considered by the state as racially valuable. They are part of a new exhibition called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at the museum explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.
A World War II Soviet women’s camouflaged sniper uniform is displayed with a sniper rifle in an exhibit called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at The International Museum of World War II, in Natick, Mass. The new exhibit explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.
A World War II-era, black-and-white photograph of French student Simone Billard is attached to a fake identity card created by the French Resistance in an exhibit called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at The International Museum of World War II, in Natick, Mass. Billard used a homemade radio to listen to the British Broadcasting Corporation, or BBC, during the war, which was an offense in Nazi-occupied France that could incur severe punishment. The new exhibit explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.
Sue Wilkins, director of education at The International Museum of World War II, holds a 1945 newspaper photograph at the museum, in Natick, Mass., that shows Fern Corbett, 24, working as a window washer 10 floors above a Minneapolis street during World War II. Corbett worked as her company’s stenographer before filling in as a window washer due to the absence of male workers during the war. The photograph is part of a new exhibit called: “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” that explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.

From snipers to moms: World War II exhibit focuses on women

Sue Wilkins, director of education at The International Museum of World War II, in Natick, Mass., stands near a 1933 propaganda poster, right, that praised the Nazi organization German Labor Front, which was created after the Nazis eliminated trade unions. A mannequin, center, displays a uniform of the Nazi Lebensborn program, designed to be worn by women bearing children considered by the state as racially valuable. They are part of a new exhibition called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at the museum explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.
A World War II Soviet women’s camouflaged sniper uniform is displayed with a sniper rifle in an exhibit called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at The International Museum of World War II, in Natick, Mass. The new exhibit explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.
A World War II-era, black-and-white photograph of French student Simone Billard is attached to a fake identity card created by the French Resistance in an exhibit called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at The International Museum of World War II, in Natick, Mass. Billard used a homemade radio to listen to the British Broadcasting Corporation, or BBC, during the war, which was an offense in Nazi-occupied France that could incur severe punishment. The new exhibit explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.
Sue Wilkins, director of education at The International Museum of World War II, holds a 1945 newspaper photograph at the museum, in Natick, Mass., that shows Fern Corbett, 24, working as a window washer 10 floors above a Minneapolis street during World War II. Corbett worked as her company’s stenographer before filling in as a window washer due to the absence of male workers during the war. The photograph is part of a new exhibit called: “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” that explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.

From snipers to moms: World War II exhibit focuses on women

A British World War II recruitment poster, left, created by graphic designer Abram Games, to encourage women to join the Auxiliary Territorial Service, forms part of a new exhibit called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at The International Museum of World War II, in Natick, Mass. The exhibit explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.

From snipers to moms: World War II exhibit focuses on women

A World War II British ration card, right, rests on a flyer, center, that shows a woman operating machinery juxtaposed with a depiction of a family doing yard work, in a display at The International World War II Museum, in Natick, Mass. A new exhibit called “Women in WWII: On the Home Fronts and the Battlefronts” at the museum explores the important and unconventional roles women played in every large nation that fought in World War II.