Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock ’69 concert field

Southwest Life

Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock ’69 concert field

Paul Brown, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, measures a dig at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. The main mission of Binghamton University’s Public Archaeology Facility is to help map out more exactly where The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker wowed the crowds 49 years ago.
Members of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University work at the site of the 1969 original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Information from the dig will help a museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Josh Anderson, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, photographs an excavation at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Information from the dig will help a museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Collected artifacts from a dig are recorded at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. The main mission of Binghamton University’s Public Archaeology Facility was to help map out more exactly where The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker wowed the crowds 49 years ago.
Jesse Pagels, left, and Edgar Alarcon, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, start a new dig at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Information from the dig will help a museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Visitors to the Museum at Bethel Woods, watch a video of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Aging baby boomers might blanch at the thought of archaeologists combing over the place that literally lent its name to their generation, as if it was a Civil War battle site. But Max Yasgur’s old farm about 80 miles north of New York City is already on the National Register of Historic Places.
Visitors to the Museum at Bethel Woods, view exhibits of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. “This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s,” said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He said the archeologists’ work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Associated Press

An Aug. 16, 1969, aerial photo shows music fans at the original Woodstock Music and Arts Festival are packed around the stage, at bottom, in Bethel, N.Y. Archaeologists from New York’s Binghamton University are trying to find the exact location of the stage and light and speaker towers and say aerial shots taken nearly 50 years ago can’t be relied upon to help them, because the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late ‘90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances, and the spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted fill.

Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock ’69 concert field

Paul Brown, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, measures a dig at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. The main mission of Binghamton University’s Public Archaeology Facility is to help map out more exactly where The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker wowed the crowds 49 years ago.
Members of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University work at the site of the 1969 original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Information from the dig will help a museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Josh Anderson, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, photographs an excavation at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Information from the dig will help a museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Collected artifacts from a dig are recorded at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. The main mission of Binghamton University’s Public Archaeology Facility was to help map out more exactly where The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin and Joe Cocker wowed the crowds 49 years ago.
Jesse Pagels, left, and Edgar Alarcon, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, start a new dig at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Information from the dig will help a museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Visitors to the Museum at Bethel Woods, watch a video of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Aging baby boomers might blanch at the thought of archaeologists combing over the place that literally lent its name to their generation, as if it was a Civil War battle site. But Max Yasgur’s old farm about 80 miles north of New York City is already on the National Register of Historic Places.
Visitors to the Museum at Bethel Woods, view exhibits of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. “This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s,” said Wade Lawrence, director of The Museum at Bethel Woods. He said the archeologists’ work will help the museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.
Associated Press

An Aug. 16, 1969, aerial photo shows music fans at the original Woodstock Music and Arts Festival are packed around the stage, at bottom, in Bethel, N.Y. Archaeologists from New York’s Binghamton University are trying to find the exact location of the stage and light and speaker towers and say aerial shots taken nearly 50 years ago can’t be relied upon to help them, because the bottom of the hillside was re-graded in the late ‘90s to accommodate a temporary stage for anniversary performances, and the spot of the original stage is under a layer of compacted fill.

Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock ’69 concert field

Paul Brown, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, sifts through dirt for artifacts at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Information from the dig will help a museum plan interpretive walking routes in time for the concert’s 50th anniversary next year.

Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock ’69 concert field

Paul Brown, of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University, displays a pop top recovered from a dig at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. The five-day dig didn’t exactly yield a mind-blowing haul: a couple of beer pull tabs and bits of broken bottle glass. They were more interested in defining the original stage where such acts as Jimi Hendrix and Santana performed.

Dig it: Archaeologists scour Woodstock ’69 concert field

Wade Lawrence, right, museum director and senior curator at The Museum at Bethel Woods, looks at artifacts recovered from a dig at the site of the original Woodstock Music and Art Fair, in Bethel, N.Y. Edgar Alarcon of the Public Archaeology Facility at Binghamton University looks on at left. “This is a significant historic site in American culture, one of the few peaceful events that gets commemorated from the 1960s,” said Lawrence.
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