British Open returns to the nasty links of Carnoustie

Sports

British Open returns to the nasty links of Carnoustie

‘Car-nasty’ considered the toughest links course in the world
Ireland’s Padraig Harrington looks down to where his ball landed in the Barry Burn during the final round of the 2007 British Open Golf Championship at Carnoustie, Scotland. Carnoustie is known more for the calamity it causes than the British Open champions it produces. Harrington hit into the burn twice on the 18th hole, made double bogey and still won in a playoff.
France’s Jean Van de Velde smiles as he stands in the water of the Barry Burn that crosses the 18th fairway to see if his ball, bottom center, was playable during the final round of the 128th British Open Golf Championship at Carnoustie, Scotland. Carnoustie is known more for the calamity it causes than the British Open champions it produces, including the most famous collapse of all by Van de Velde.
Ben Hogan holds his trophy after winning the 1953 British Open Golf Championship at Carnoustie, Scotland. Carnoustie is known more for the calamity it causes than the British Open champions it produces. That reputation is what awaits the world’s best when the 147th edition of the British Open returns to what many consider the toughest links in the world.

British Open returns to the nasty links of Carnoustie

Ireland’s Padraig Harrington looks down to where his ball landed in the Barry Burn during the final round of the 2007 British Open Golf Championship at Carnoustie, Scotland. Carnoustie is known more for the calamity it causes than the British Open champions it produces. Harrington hit into the burn twice on the 18th hole, made double bogey and still won in a playoff.
France’s Jean Van de Velde smiles as he stands in the water of the Barry Burn that crosses the 18th fairway to see if his ball, bottom center, was playable during the final round of the 128th British Open Golf Championship at Carnoustie, Scotland. Carnoustie is known more for the calamity it causes than the British Open champions it produces, including the most famous collapse of all by Van de Velde.
Ben Hogan holds his trophy after winning the 1953 British Open Golf Championship at Carnoustie, Scotland. Carnoustie is known more for the calamity it causes than the British Open champions it produces. That reputation is what awaits the world’s best when the 147th edition of the British Open returns to what many consider the toughest links in the world.
click here to add your event
Area Events