Mushroom medicine

Southwest Life

Mushroom medicine

Durango herbalist says fungi have a role in health realm
There are 15,000 identifiable species of mushrooms, and only 2,000 of those are edible. The most dangerous toxins have delayed effects, taking hours or days to show. Microbiologist Anna-Marija Helt teaches workshops about mushrooms, their medicinal properties and how to identify poisonous ones. From left to right: reishi, artist conk, oyster, shiitake, portabello and phellinus.
Ancient Romans have said that mushrooms are the “food of the Gods,” and Anna-Marija Helt teaches a class about mushrooms and the medicines that can be made from them. John Velasquez, left, looks at a mushroom while Helt, center, explains mushrooms to Bridey Conway and the rest of the class.
Microbiologist Anna-Marija Helt says one way to identify mushrooms is to cut off the head of the mushroom, place it on a piece of paper and cover it with a bowl. When the mushroom releases its spores, a person can see them on the paper.
“Let food be your medicine, and medicine be your food,” according to a Hippocratic writing. Paul Ambrose and Karen Mee look at mushrooms passed around during Anna-Marija Helt’s lecture about mushrooms and their medicinal qualities.

Mushroom medicine

There are 15,000 identifiable species of mushrooms, and only 2,000 of those are edible. The most dangerous toxins have delayed effects, taking hours or days to show. Microbiologist Anna-Marija Helt teaches workshops about mushrooms, their medicinal properties and how to identify poisonous ones. From left to right: reishi, artist conk, oyster, shiitake, portabello and phellinus.
Ancient Romans have said that mushrooms are the “food of the Gods,” and Anna-Marija Helt teaches a class about mushrooms and the medicines that can be made from them. John Velasquez, left, looks at a mushroom while Helt, center, explains mushrooms to Bridey Conway and the rest of the class.
Microbiologist Anna-Marija Helt says one way to identify mushrooms is to cut off the head of the mushroom, place it on a piece of paper and cover it with a bowl. When the mushroom releases its spores, a person can see them on the paper.
“Let food be your medicine, and medicine be your food,” according to a Hippocratic writing. Paul Ambrose and Karen Mee look at mushrooms passed around during Anna-Marija Helt’s lecture about mushrooms and their medicinal qualities.
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