Laid low by time: A tiny English village abandoned during WWII

Southwest Life

Laid low by time: A tiny English village abandoned during WWII

Grass and nettles grow up around a row of abandoned, dilapidated cottages in the “ghost village” of Tyneham, in Dorset, England. The tiny settlement was evacuated in 1943 to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day in World War II. The people were never allowed to return, and it remains in military hands.
Two visitors pause close to an information board outside a row of ruined cottages in Tyneham, Dorset, in southwestern England. The residents of the tiny village were compulsorily evacuated in late 1943 to provide extra land for military training, ahead of D-Day, and were never allowed back. In the years since, their homes have fallen apart as weather has rotted the timbers and nature has reclaimed the land. Tyneham is still in military hands but it is open to visitors most weekends.
A British Ministry of Defense sign warns visitors that they are on a firing range near Dorset, England. The adjacent road leads to Tyneham, a village which was ordered evacuated in 1943 to provide extra land for military exercises ahead of D-Day. The village remains in the hands of the military and has become a tourist attraction, providing a poignant and unusual reminder of World War II.
The remains of a fireplace and a missing window, in a ruined cottage in Tyneham. The village was commandeered by the military in 1943 and the people evacuated. They were never allowed back and Tyneham remains in the hands of the Ministry of Defense. The village dwellings have slowly fallen apart, as weather rotted the roof beams and upper floors and nature reclaimed the interiors.
A row of ruined cottages at the entrance to Tyneham in southwestern England. The tiny village was taken over by the British military in late 1943 to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day. The people were never allowed to return and the houses have slowly fallen apart.
St Mary’s Church in Tyneham stands beneath a brilliant blue sky. The tiny settlement in Dorset, England, was taken over by the British military in late 1943 to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day. When the residents left, one of them pinned a note to the church door asking that the homes and buildings be treated with respect, as they fully expected to return. But they never did, and Tyneham remains in military hands. The church has been maintained, but time and nature have overwhelmed the dwellings, earning Tyneham the nickname of the “ghost village.”
Thistles grow beside a row of ruined cottages, in the English “ghost village” of Tyneham, near the Dorset coast. The military took it over in 1943, at the height of World War II to provide more land for training and has never given it back. The abandoned village is a striking and rare reminder of the sacrifices made by ordinary people during war.
If you go

TYNEHAM: Located about a three-hour drive from London, close to the southwestern coast, roughly between Lulworth and Corfe, in the county of Dorset. There is signposting close to the village but it is minimal and easily missed. Even a GPS will only put you in the general location. It is not served by public transport. Open most weekends and public holidays, though it is best to check by calling (44)-1929-404819 for a recorded message giving current information. Parking is free, though a donation of 2 pounds is suggested. There is no shop, toilets or visitor center.

Laid low by time: A tiny English village abandoned during WWII

Grass and nettles grow up around a row of abandoned, dilapidated cottages in the “ghost village” of Tyneham, in Dorset, England. The tiny settlement was evacuated in 1943 to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day in World War II. The people were never allowed to return, and it remains in military hands.
Two visitors pause close to an information board outside a row of ruined cottages in Tyneham, Dorset, in southwestern England. The residents of the tiny village were compulsorily evacuated in late 1943 to provide extra land for military training, ahead of D-Day, and were never allowed back. In the years since, their homes have fallen apart as weather has rotted the timbers and nature has reclaimed the land. Tyneham is still in military hands but it is open to visitors most weekends.
A British Ministry of Defense sign warns visitors that they are on a firing range near Dorset, England. The adjacent road leads to Tyneham, a village which was ordered evacuated in 1943 to provide extra land for military exercises ahead of D-Day. The village remains in the hands of the military and has become a tourist attraction, providing a poignant and unusual reminder of World War II.
The remains of a fireplace and a missing window, in a ruined cottage in Tyneham. The village was commandeered by the military in 1943 and the people evacuated. They were never allowed back and Tyneham remains in the hands of the Ministry of Defense. The village dwellings have slowly fallen apart, as weather rotted the roof beams and upper floors and nature reclaimed the interiors.
A row of ruined cottages at the entrance to Tyneham in southwestern England. The tiny village was taken over by the British military in late 1943 to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day. The people were never allowed to return and the houses have slowly fallen apart.
St Mary’s Church in Tyneham stands beneath a brilliant blue sky. The tiny settlement in Dorset, England, was taken over by the British military in late 1943 to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day. When the residents left, one of them pinned a note to the church door asking that the homes and buildings be treated with respect, as they fully expected to return. But they never did, and Tyneham remains in military hands. The church has been maintained, but time and nature have overwhelmed the dwellings, earning Tyneham the nickname of the “ghost village.”
Thistles grow beside a row of ruined cottages, in the English “ghost village” of Tyneham, near the Dorset coast. The military took it over in 1943, at the height of World War II to provide more land for training and has never given it back. The abandoned village is a striking and rare reminder of the sacrifices made by ordinary people during war.

Laid low by time: A tiny English village abandoned during WWII

Light pours through the empty window frame of a ruined cottage, in Tyneham, England’s “ghost village.” All the homes in the tiny settlement have fallen apart since it was taken over by the military at the height of World War II to provide more land for D-Day training. Tyneham is still in the hands of the Ministry of Defense, but visitors are allowed in most weekends.

Laid low by time: A tiny English village abandoned during WWII

A visitor inspects the interior of a ruined cottage in the abandoned village of Tyneham, England. The British War Department took over the tiny settlement in late 1943 to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day. The residents have never been allowed back. The ruined village remains in military hands but is opened to tourists most weekends.

Laid low by time: A tiny English village abandoned during WWII

The remains of an iron fireplace in the wall of an upper floor, in a cottage in the abandoned “ghost village” of Tyneham, in southwestern England. Time and nature have overwhelmed the dwellings since the tiny settlement was taken over by the military during World War II to provide more land for training ahead of D-Day. Visitors are allowed access most weekends.
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