Sierra Edd’s art and activism makes space for Native women

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Sierra Edd’s art and activism makes space for Native women

Durango High School and Brown University graduate centers her work on messages of gender violence and decolonization
Sierra Edd’s book

Sierra Edd’s book, “Red House Wandering,” is a collection of her poetry, photographs and paintings.
In it, she writes that her “art is a culmination of the labors of my mother, and her mother, and is now one way of giving back to them. My activism and my storytelling must be visible in order to counteract the historic amnesia of the effects of global capitalism, colonialism, and white supremacy.”
Edd’s book is available for purchase at Maria’s Bookshop, 960 Main Ave.

Sierra Edd’s art and activism makes space for Native women

Sierra Edd is an artist and activist who spent this summer working on several projects, including her painting “Bound to Empire.” Edd is a graduate of Durango High School and Brown University and will attend the University of California Berkeley this fall to work on her doctorate in ethnic studies.

Sierra Edd’s art and activism makes space for Native women

Sierra Edd is an artist and activist who spent this summer working at her family’s Bayfield home, with the family’s dog Dusty alongside them, on several art projects. Edd is a graduate of Durango High School and Brown University and will attend the University of California Berkeley this fall to work on her doctorate in ethnic studies.

Sierra Edd’s art and activism makes space for Native women

In 1974, white teenagers beat and killed three Navajo men in Farmington; the teenagers were sent to reform school, not prison. “Indian rolling” was a common occurrence. The murders sparked outrage and the American Indian Movement led protests for several days against ongoing violence in the town the borders the Navajo Nation. The incident also prompted the U.S. Civil Rights Commission to investigate, and it found that there was widespread prejudice against Navajo people.

Sierra Edd’s art and activism makes space for Native women

After Sierra Edd graduated from Brown University this spring, she moved back to Bayfield for the summer to work on her artwork alongside her sisters and parents, all of whom are artists. Edd and her sisters have started to do screen printing and have created a line of T-shirts and tote bags that have Navajo- and Native-themed messages. They sell the items on Etsy.
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