Los Alamos lab researching algae to convert to affordable fuel

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Los Alamos lab researching algae to convert to affordable fuel

Los Alamos National Laboratory molecular biologist Amanda Barry inspects mini-ponds of algae at the greenhouse July 26 at the New Mexico Consortium building in Los Alamos. The algae are being grown under natural light to mimic small outdoor algae production ponds with moving paddles to provide air and to distribute light evenly.
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers Jenna Schambach, left, and Sara Lamcaj, examine algae cultures and count cells in experiments to see if algae can become a viable biofuel.
Los Alamos National Laboratory molecular biologist Amanda Barry inspects mini-ponds of algae at the greenhouse at the New Mexico Consortium building in Los Alamos. The algae are being grown under natural light to mimic small outdoor algae production ponds with moving paddles to provide air and to distribute light evenly.
Los Alamos National Laboratory molecular biologist Amanda Barry holds a particular strain of algae that researchers are working with to see it could be cheaply massed-produced for biofuel for cars, trucks and planes.

Los Alamos lab researching algae to convert to affordable fuel

Los Alamos National Laboratory molecular biologist Amanda Barry inspects mini-ponds of algae at the greenhouse July 26 at the New Mexico Consortium building in Los Alamos. The algae are being grown under natural light to mimic small outdoor algae production ponds with moving paddles to provide air and to distribute light evenly.
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers Jenna Schambach, left, and Sara Lamcaj, examine algae cultures and count cells in experiments to see if algae can become a viable biofuel.
Los Alamos National Laboratory molecular biologist Amanda Barry inspects mini-ponds of algae at the greenhouse at the New Mexico Consortium building in Los Alamos. The algae are being grown under natural light to mimic small outdoor algae production ponds with moving paddles to provide air and to distribute light evenly.
Los Alamos National Laboratory molecular biologist Amanda Barry holds a particular strain of algae that researchers are working with to see it could be cheaply massed-produced for biofuel for cars, trucks and planes.
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