Science Says: Hotter weather turbocharges U.S. West wildfires

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Science Says: Hotter weather turbocharges U.S. West wildfires

Firefighters monitor a backfire Aug. 7, 2018, while battling the Ranch Fire, part of the Mendocino Complex Fire near Ladoga, Calif. The years with the most acres burned by wildfires have some of the hottest temperatures, an Associated Press analysis of fire and weather data found. As human-caused climate change has warmed the world over the past 35 years, the land consumed in flames has more than doubled.

Science Says: Hotter weather turbocharges U.S. West wildfires

Firefighters monitor a backfire Aug. 7, 2018, while battling the Ranch Fire, part of the Mendocino Complex Fire near Ladoga, Calif. The years with the most acres burned by wildfires have some of the hottest temperatures, an Associated Press analysis of fire and weather data found. As human-caused climate change has warmed the world over the past 35 years, the land consumed in flames has more than doubled.

Science Says: Hotter weather turbocharges U.S. West wildfires

Firefighter Mike Sugaski packs his gear in his garage in Salida. The veteran firefighter used to think a fire of 10,000 acres was big. Now he fights fires 10 times as large. “You kind of keep saying ‘How can they get much worse?’ But they do.”