Colorado voters will face redistricting ballot measures

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Colorado voters will face redistricting ballot measures

Amendments Y and Z would create commissions to redraw congressional boundaries
Colorado’s current congressional district boundaries.
Amendments Y and Z: How they would work

Create separate 12-member commissions for legislative and congressional redistricting each with four Republicans, four Democrats and four unaffiliated members.
Set up a three-member panel of retired judges to narrow the pool of applicants. Six of the 12 members – two Republicans, two Democrats and two unaffiliated members – would be chosen by the panel of judges to reflect Colorado based on statewide geography and demographics.
Block commission members who are lobbyists, officeholders, party officials or anyone paid by a member of Congress within the last three years, as well as any candidate for federal office within the last five years.
Require proposed maps subject to any deliberation to be drawn by nonpartisan staff members.
Require deliberations for each change to the map to be in public meetings and require a supermajority that includes at least two votes from unaffiliated members for passage.
Require districts that “focus on communities of interest and political subdivisions, such as cities and counties, and then to maximize the number of competitive congressional seats to the extent possible; and prohibiting maps from being drawn to dilute the electoral influence of any racial or ethnic group or to protect any incumbent, any political candidate, or any political party,” according to legislation authorizing the ballot measure.
Allow judicial review of the final map is required, but the state Supreme Court is limited to determining whether the commission or its nonpartisan staff abused discretion.

Colorado voters will face redistricting ballot measures

Colorado’s current congressional district boundaries.
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