Durango man living full life after pancreatic cancer diagnosis

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Durango man living full life after pancreatic cancer diagnosis

Combination of naturopathic and traditional medicine proves effective for Tom Riesing
Tom Riesing takes part in a Nia class led by Evonne Tocco at the Smiley Building in July. Nia combines martial arts and dance. Riesing was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2013 and attributes his survival largely to having pursued a blend of allopathic and naturopathic treatments.
Tom Riesing takes part in a Nia class – a blend of martial arts and dance – led by Evonne Tocco in July at the Smiley Building. Riesing, 80, has stayed active since his pancreatic diagnosis, cross-country skiing, swimming and cycling.
Tom Riesing takes part in a Nia class – a blend of martial arts and dance – led by Evonne Tocco in July at the Smiley Building. He started dancing two months after having a cancer tumor removed from his pancreas.
Durangoan Tom Riesing receives localized hyperthermia treatments at a clinic in Fort Langley, British Columbia. The treatment uses a modulated electric field that targets cancer cells because they are more conductive than healthy cells.
Durangoan Tom Riesing receives hyperthermia treatment for his pancreatic cancer in Fort Langley, British Columbia. Under the lights, his body temperature rises above 100 degrees, which heightens the response of the immune system like a natural fever.

Durango man living full life after pancreatic cancer diagnosis

Tom Riesing takes part in a Nia class led by Evonne Tocco at the Smiley Building in July. Nia combines martial arts and dance. Riesing was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2013 and attributes his survival largely to having pursued a blend of allopathic and naturopathic treatments.
Tom Riesing takes part in a Nia class – a blend of martial arts and dance – led by Evonne Tocco in July at the Smiley Building. Riesing, 80, has stayed active since his pancreatic diagnosis, cross-country skiing, swimming and cycling.
Tom Riesing takes part in a Nia class – a blend of martial arts and dance – led by Evonne Tocco in July at the Smiley Building. He started dancing two months after having a cancer tumor removed from his pancreas.
Durangoan Tom Riesing receives localized hyperthermia treatments at a clinic in Fort Langley, British Columbia. The treatment uses a modulated electric field that targets cancer cells because they are more conductive than healthy cells.
Durangoan Tom Riesing receives hyperthermia treatment for his pancreatic cancer in Fort Langley, British Columbia. Under the lights, his body temperature rises above 100 degrees, which heightens the response of the immune system like a natural fever.
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