From penny press to Snapchat: Parents fret through the ages

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From penny press to Snapchat: Parents fret through the ages

Carlos Tunnerman, 10, plays the “Contra” video game at an arcade in a Miami, Fla. Decades of study have failed to validate the most prevalent fear, that violent games encourage violent behavior. But from the moment the games emerged as a cultural force in the early 1980s, parents fretted about the way kids could lose themselves in games as simple and repetitive as “Pac-Man,” “Asteroids” and “Space Invaders.”

From penny press to Snapchat: Parents fret through the ages

Carlos Tunnerman, 10, plays the “Contra” video game at an arcade in a Miami, Fla. Decades of study have failed to validate the most prevalent fear, that violent games encourage violent behavior. But from the moment the games emerged as a cultural force in the early 1980s, parents fretted about the way kids could lose themselves in games as simple and repetitive as “Pac-Man,” “Asteroids” and “Space Invaders.”

From penny press to Snapchat: Parents fret through the ages

Kathy and Steve Dennis display several of their own cellphones and computer tablets along with their 1980s-era Apple II+ computer bought for their then young sons in Bellevue, Wash. Three decades ago they never heard the phrase “screen time,” nor did they worry much about limiting the time the kids spent with technology, considering the computer an investment in their future. Things have changed with their grandkids and their phones.
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