Civil rights legend James Meredith says he’s on a mission from God

Civil rights legend James Meredith says he’s on a mission from God

James Meredith confronting society’s ‘breakdown of moral character’
Civil rights activist James Meredith says, “I’ve been in the God business all my life. Ole Miss to me was nothing but a mission from God. The Meredith March Against Fear was my most important mission from God, until this one coming up right now: Raising the moral character up, and making people aware of their duty to follow God’s plan and the teachings of Jesus Christ.”
Civil rights activist James Meredith, right, takes a coffee break at a north Jackson, Miss., grocery store and speaks to friend Bob Litro. Meredith’s latest plan to action, “a mission from God” involves him visiting all 82 Mississippi counties and preaching about following the Ten Commandments and the Golden Rule.
Civil rights activist James Meredith, greets some children and their mother at a Jackson, Miss., public library. Meredith is a civil rights legend who resists neatly defined narratives. He integrated the University of Mississippi amid mob violence in 1962 and later worked for a politician seen as a foe of the civil rights movement. Now, at age 85, Meredith says he has a new mission from God – to confront what he sees as society’s “breakdown of moral character.”
In this Oct. 1, 1962, photo, James Meredith, center, is escorted by federal marshals as he appears for his first day of class at the previously all-white University of Mississippi, in Oxford, Miss. Meredith grew up in segregated Mississippi, served in the Air Force and sued to gain admission as the first black student at the state’s flagship university.
In this June 6, 1966, photo, civil rights activist James Meredith grimaces in pain as he pulls himself across Highway 51 after being shot in Hernando, Miss., during his March Against Fear. Meredith set out to prove a black man could walk through Mississippi without fear, aiming to trek from Memphis, Tennessee, to Jackson. On the second day, a white man shot and wounded him. Other civil rights leaders, including Martin Luther King Jr., arrived to continue the march.

Civil rights legend James Meredith says he’s on a mission from God

Civil rights activist James Meredith says, “I’ve been in the God business all my life. Ole Miss to me was nothing but a mission from God. The Meredith March Against Fear was my most important mission from God, until this one coming up right now: Raising the moral character up, and making people aware of their duty to follow God’s plan and the teachings of Jesus Christ.”
Civil rights activist James Meredith, right, takes a coffee break at a north Jackson, Miss., grocery store and speaks to friend Bob Litro. Meredith’s latest plan to action, “a mission from God” involves him visiting all 82 Mississippi counties and preaching about following the Ten Commandments and the Golden Rule.
Civil rights activist James Meredith, greets some children and their mother at a Jackson, Miss., public library. Meredith is a civil rights legend who resists neatly defined narratives. He integrated the University of Mississippi amid mob violence in 1962 and later worked for a politician seen as a foe of the civil rights movement. Now, at age 85, Meredith says he has a new mission from God – to confront what he sees as society’s “breakdown of moral character.”
In this Oct. 1, 1962, photo, James Meredith, center, is escorted by federal marshals as he appears for his first day of class at the previously all-white University of Mississippi, in Oxford, Miss. Meredith grew up in segregated Mississippi, served in the Air Force and sued to gain admission as the first black student at the state’s flagship university.
In this June 6, 1966, photo, civil rights activist James Meredith grimaces in pain as he pulls himself across Highway 51 after being shot in Hernando, Miss., during his March Against Fear. Meredith set out to prove a black man could walk through Mississippi without fear, aiming to trek from Memphis, Tennessee, to Jackson. On the second day, a white man shot and wounded him. Other civil rights leaders, including Martin Luther King Jr., arrived to continue the march.