What’s next in 416 Fire burn area? Look to Missionary Ridge

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What’s next in 416 Fire burn area? Look to Missionary Ridge

With time and patience, forest will return, but it will be different
Fort Lewis College environmental biology professor Julie Korb holds a cut of ponderosa pine, which grew from 1713 to 1818 and shows fire damage. She was participating in a tour Friday in the Hermosa area of the 416 Fire burn area. Korb, who is also a forest and fire ecologist, is working on a project this year about the Missionary Ridge Fire.
Fort Lewis College environmental studies students Abby Borge, left, of Talkeetna, Alaska, and Sara Squirrel of Montrose look at a piece of trunk from a ponderosa pine that shows fire damage that took place from 1713 to 1818. The two seniors were part of a tour of the areas burned in the Missionary Ridge and 416 fires.
Anna Taugher, a botanist from Mancos, takes notes during a tour of the 416 Fire burn area Friday in the Hermosa area.
Burn scars from the 416 Fire can be seen Friday from Missionary Ridge. Forest managers say regrowth of areas damaged by the fire will be similar to what has occurred during the past 16 years on the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area.
New tree growth is taking place on Missionary Ridge, which was burned by fire in 2002. The area is an example of what may happen throughout the 416 Fire burn area.
Trees burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire intermingle with new growth. Forest managers say the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area provides a glimpse at what regrowth may look like on the 416 Fire, which burned 54,000 acres this summer on the west side of the Animas Valley.
The Missionary Ridge Fire burned nearly 72,000 acres of forest land, but after 16 years, a new forest is taking root.
The 416 Fire burned a mosaic of all different fire intensities. Some areas had 100 percent tree mortality, while other spots did not burn at all.

What’s next in 416 Fire burn area? Look to Missionary Ridge

Fort Lewis College environmental biology professor Julie Korb holds a cut of ponderosa pine, which grew from 1713 to 1818 and shows fire damage. She was participating in a tour Friday in the Hermosa area of the 416 Fire burn area. Korb, who is also a forest and fire ecologist, is working on a project this year about the Missionary Ridge Fire.
Fort Lewis College environmental studies students Abby Borge, left, of Talkeetna, Alaska, and Sara Squirrel of Montrose look at a piece of trunk from a ponderosa pine that shows fire damage that took place from 1713 to 1818. The two seniors were part of a tour of the areas burned in the Missionary Ridge and 416 fires.
Anna Taugher, a botanist from Mancos, takes notes during a tour of the 416 Fire burn area Friday in the Hermosa area.
Burn scars from the 416 Fire can be seen Friday from Missionary Ridge. Forest managers say regrowth of areas damaged by the fire will be similar to what has occurred during the past 16 years on the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area.
New tree growth is taking place on Missionary Ridge, which was burned by fire in 2002. The area is an example of what may happen throughout the 416 Fire burn area.
Trees burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire intermingle with new growth. Forest managers say the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area provides a glimpse at what regrowth may look like on the 416 Fire, which burned 54,000 acres this summer on the west side of the Animas Valley.
The Missionary Ridge Fire burned nearly 72,000 acres of forest land, but after 16 years, a new forest is taking root.
The 416 Fire burned a mosaic of all different fire intensities. Some areas had 100 percent tree mortality, while other spots did not burn at all.
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