Implant, intense rehab help 3 people paralyzed for years take steps

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Implant, intense rehab help 3 people paralyzed for years take steps

Jered Chinnock walks down a clinic hallway with his therapy team at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. on Sept. 18, 2018. Chinnock, paralyzed since 2013, is taking steps again thanks to an electrical implant that zaps his injured spine and months of intense rehab as part of a medical study at the clinic. From left are physical therapist Megan Gill, Chinnock, kinesiologists Daniel Veith and Margaux Linde, and doctoral candidate Jonathan Calvert.
Jeff Marquis of Louisville, Ky., is helped by a physical therapist during a study at the university that aimed to help the paralyzed stand and take steps with a combination of spinal stimulation and intense rehab. Marquis was paralyzed in a mountain biking accident.
Dr. Kendall Lee, co-principal investigator and director of Mayo Clinic Neural Engineering Laboratories, poses for a portrait at the clinic in Rochester, Minn. on Sept. 18, 2018. Lee, who treated Jered Chinnock said that the study involving electrical implants, “gives hope to people who are faced with paralysis that functional control may be possible.”
Kristin Zhao, co-principal investigator and director of Mayo Clinic Assistive and Restorative Technology Laboratory, poses for a portrait at the clinic in Rochester, Minn. on Sept. 18, 2018. Behind her are patient Jered Chinnock and Peter Grahn, senior engineer and a co-author of the study. Chinnock tells his therapists when he’s going to start, stop or speed up, Zhao said. “It’s very much a thoughtful, intentional movement.”

Implant, intense rehab help 3 people paralyzed for years take steps

Jered Chinnock walks down a clinic hallway with his therapy team at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. on Sept. 18, 2018. Chinnock, paralyzed since 2013, is taking steps again thanks to an electrical implant that zaps his injured spine and months of intense rehab as part of a medical study at the clinic. From left are physical therapist Megan Gill, Chinnock, kinesiologists Daniel Veith and Margaux Linde, and doctoral candidate Jonathan Calvert.
Jeff Marquis of Louisville, Ky., is helped by a physical therapist during a study at the university that aimed to help the paralyzed stand and take steps with a combination of spinal stimulation and intense rehab. Marquis was paralyzed in a mountain biking accident.
Dr. Kendall Lee, co-principal investigator and director of Mayo Clinic Neural Engineering Laboratories, poses for a portrait at the clinic in Rochester, Minn. on Sept. 18, 2018. Lee, who treated Jered Chinnock said that the study involving electrical implants, “gives hope to people who are faced with paralysis that functional control may be possible.”
Kristin Zhao, co-principal investigator and director of Mayo Clinic Assistive and Restorative Technology Laboratory, poses for a portrait at the clinic in Rochester, Minn. on Sept. 18, 2018. Behind her are patient Jered Chinnock and Peter Grahn, senior engineer and a co-author of the study. Chinnock tells his therapists when he’s going to start, stop or speed up, Zhao said. “It’s very much a thoughtful, intentional movement.”

Implant, intense rehab help 3 people paralyzed for years take steps

Jered Chinnock stands with the assistance of his therapy team at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., on Sept. 18, 2018. Chinnock, paralyzed since 2013, can stand and take steps again thanks to an electrical implant that zaps his injured spine and months of intense rehab as part of a medical study at the clinic. From left are Margaux Linde, Megan Gill, Chinnock, Daniel Veith and Jonathan Calvert.

Implant, intense rehab help 3 people paralyzed for years take steps

Professor Susan Harkema watches as Kelly Thomas of Lecanto, Fla., practices walking with the help of a walker. “Recovery can happen if you have the right circumstances,” says Harkema, who co-authored a report on the use of electrical implants to stimulate the spinal cord.

Implant, intense rehab help 3 people paralyzed for years take steps

Jered Chinnock stands with the assistance of his therapy team at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., on Sept. 18, 2018. Chinnock, paralyzed since 2013, can stand and take steps again thanks to an electrical implant that zaps his injured spine and months of intense rehab as part of a medical study at the clinic. At right is Peter Grahn, PhD, senior engineer. Second from right is doctoral candidate Jonathan Calvert.