U.S. lacks Latino historical sites and landmarks, scholars say

Southwest Life

U.S. lacks Latino historical sites and landmarks, scholars say

A makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers who fought in the Battle of Glorieta Pass is in northern New Mexico outside of Santa Fe. It’s a typical representation of many sites linked to U.S. Latino history: It’s at risk of disappearing if it weren’t for a handful of history aficionados.
A sign at a makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers who fought in the Battle of Glorieta Pass outside Santa Fe. The lack of historical markers and preserved historical sites connected to Latino civil rights worries scholars who feel the scarcity is affecting how Americans see Hispanics in U.S. history.
The United Farm Workers of America flag and the Virgin of Guadalupe statue are part of an exhibit in the visitor center at La Paz, now the Cesar E. Chávez National Monument, the property that served as the home and planning center of Chicano leader Cesar Chavez and his farmworker movement starting in the 1970s in Keene, Calif. Meanwhile, the site of his birthplace sits abandoned in Yuma, Ariz.
Physician and surgeon Dr. Hector Perez Garcia, whose goal was to fight for a better deal for U.S. Latin American citizens, in Corpus Christi, Texas. The office of 4, where the Mexican American civil rights movement was sparked, is gone and is an example that many Latino historical preservation advocates say shows more needs to be done to save sites linked to Latino history.
The grave of Chicano farmworker leader Cesar Chavez in the memorial garden at La Paz, the United Farm Workers of America headquarters, now the Cesar E. Chávez National Monument, in Keene, Calif. Meanwhile, the site of his birthplace sits abandoned in Yuma, Ariz,. The lack of historical markers and preserved historical sites connected to Latino civil rights worries scholars who feel the scarcity is affecting how Americans see Hispanics in U.S. history.

U.S. lacks Latino historical sites and landmarks, scholars say

A makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers who fought in the Battle of Glorieta Pass is in northern New Mexico outside of Santa Fe. It’s a typical representation of many sites linked to U.S. Latino history: It’s at risk of disappearing if it weren’t for a handful of history aficionados.
A sign at a makeshift memorial to Hispanic Civil War Union soldiers who fought in the Battle of Glorieta Pass outside Santa Fe. The lack of historical markers and preserved historical sites connected to Latino civil rights worries scholars who feel the scarcity is affecting how Americans see Hispanics in U.S. history.
The United Farm Workers of America flag and the Virgin of Guadalupe statue are part of an exhibit in the visitor center at La Paz, now the Cesar E. Chávez National Monument, the property that served as the home and planning center of Chicano leader Cesar Chavez and his farmworker movement starting in the 1970s in Keene, Calif. Meanwhile, the site of his birthplace sits abandoned in Yuma, Ariz.
Physician and surgeon Dr. Hector Perez Garcia, whose goal was to fight for a better deal for U.S. Latin American citizens, in Corpus Christi, Texas. The office of 4, where the Mexican American civil rights movement was sparked, is gone and is an example that many Latino historical preservation advocates say shows more needs to be done to save sites linked to Latino history.
The grave of Chicano farmworker leader Cesar Chavez in the memorial garden at La Paz, the United Farm Workers of America headquarters, now the Cesar E. Chávez National Monument, in Keene, Calif. Meanwhile, the site of his birthplace sits abandoned in Yuma, Ariz,. The lack of historical markers and preserved historical sites connected to Latino civil rights worries scholars who feel the scarcity is affecting how Americans see Hispanics in U.S. history.
click here to add your event
Area Events