Can we learn to live with wolves again?

Southwest Life

Can we learn to live with wolves again?

Event at Fort Lewis College to explore the possibility of reintroduction
Taxidermist Edwin Carter, also termed a “naturist,” is seen in Breckenridge with a large wolf pelt taken in the Colorado Rockies.
At the White River Museum in Meeker in a glass case is the hide and head of a snarling wolf, his pelt dusty, his teeth yellow. He was the last wolf killed in Rio Blanco County. He stares out at us with glass eyes. Close to the pelt is an historic sheep wagon, a sarsaparilla machine and other pioneer artifacts.
The original book cover art from the 1929 publication of “The Last Stand of the Pack.” Note the snarling, aggressive wolf. In the 1920s, wolves were seen as vermin to be exterminated. Now biologists realize that wolves play a vital role in diverse ecosystems as a top-tier predator keeping prey species healthy and in check.
Bureau of Biological Survey hunter Bill Smith is seen with a chained wolf pup at the entrance to a wolf den. The pup was chained to attract its parents so they could be killed.
A howling wolf has a front paw caught in a leg trap. These traps are now illegal but can be used by federal trappers working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Services Department.
A map shows were the last wolves were killed in Colorado and where historic wolf pelts can be found in the state’s museums. The map by Robert Garcia appears in the latest edition of “The Last Stand of the Pack,” by Arthur Carhart and edited by Andrew Gulliford and Tom Wolf.
If you go

The Durango Wolf Symposium will be held Nov. 29-30 at Fort Lewis College, 1000 Rim Drive.
The symposium aims to improve public understanding of gray wolf behavior, ecology and options for re-establishing the species in Colorado. The goal is to share facts, ideas and thoughts about what Colorado might look like with wolves again roaming the wilderness.
For more information and a complete schedule of events, visit bit.ly/co-wolf.

Can we learn to live with wolves again?

Taxidermist Edwin Carter, also termed a “naturist,” is seen in Breckenridge with a large wolf pelt taken in the Colorado Rockies.
At the White River Museum in Meeker in a glass case is the hide and head of a snarling wolf, his pelt dusty, his teeth yellow. He was the last wolf killed in Rio Blanco County. He stares out at us with glass eyes. Close to the pelt is an historic sheep wagon, a sarsaparilla machine and other pioneer artifacts.
The original book cover art from the 1929 publication of “The Last Stand of the Pack.” Note the snarling, aggressive wolf. In the 1920s, wolves were seen as vermin to be exterminated. Now biologists realize that wolves play a vital role in diverse ecosystems as a top-tier predator keeping prey species healthy and in check.
Bureau of Biological Survey hunter Bill Smith is seen with a chained wolf pup at the entrance to a wolf den. The pup was chained to attract its parents so they could be killed.
A howling wolf has a front paw caught in a leg trap. These traps are now illegal but can be used by federal trappers working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Services Department.
A map shows were the last wolves were killed in Colorado and where historic wolf pelts can be found in the state’s museums. The map by Robert Garcia appears in the latest edition of “The Last Stand of the Pack,” by Arthur Carhart and edited by Andrew Gulliford and Tom Wolf.

Can we learn to live with wolves again?

James Shaw holds a dead wolf killed near Thatcher in Las Animas County. This was one of the last wolves killed on Colorado’s eastern plains.

Can we learn to live with wolves again?

How odd that across Colorado and the West, hunters ruthlessly pursued wolves yet valued their power and presence enough to have them mounted, stuffed and then photographed in the same mountain landscapes from which they had been extirpated. Ecologist Aldo Leopold wrote: “Man always kills the things he loves, and so we the pioneers have killed our wilderness.”

Can we learn to live with wolves again?

“Enchantress from the Mist,” wolf cover art by Becky Hoyle Lukow of Fruitland, N.M.
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