Report says La Plata County teens lacking meaningful relationships with adults

News

Report says La Plata County teens lacking meaningful relationships with adults

State study looks at risks, barriers to suicide prevention
A report funded by the Colorado Attorney General’s Office identified suicide risks among teens in four Colorado counties that experienced suicide clusters. The Attorney General’s Office paid $173,000 for Health Management Associates to complete the study.
Warner
Burns

Report says La Plata County teens lacking meaningful relationships with adults

A report funded by the Colorado Attorney General’s Office identified suicide risks among teens in four Colorado counties that experienced suicide clusters. The Attorney General’s Office paid $173,000 for Health Management Associates to complete the study.
Warner
Burns
From the editor
Responsible reporting is our priority

The state-ordered study of youth suicide in four Colorado counties has critically important information not just for mental health officials but for all of us who live in places deeply affected by suicide.
The study encompassed a range of factors that reflect what each community is dealing with. One piece of the study addressed “traditional media and suicide.”
Researchers looked at how the media in La Plata, El Paso, Mesa and Pueblo counties covered suicide incidents. As the report said, “media sources have a great responsibility in educating the public and to do so in a way that is helpful rather than harmful.”
The study notes that the community in La Plata County has been “critical” of how suicide is reported in The Durango Herald. The researchers also looked at five years of stories published by the Herald about suicide and found that there was “problematic reporting but also found some positives.” The study also noted that the researchers found “some serious concerns” about the stories, primarily including details of suicides.
We write about those who die by suicide because it is a public health issue that affects all of us in our small community. How we write those stories is evolving, and we have ongoing conversations with those who work in suicide prevention, intervention and post-vention to learn about how our coverage affects our community.
Some members of our staff also have a place at the tables of groups that are working on how to address this increasing issue. We acknowledge that we have a role in helping our community heal and that we also have a responsibility to minimize harm.
We recognize the deep wounds suicide has made in our community in the last few years, which is why we published a multi-part series in October about solutions to youth suicide in La Plata County. This series has received many positive responses from our readers and the community at large.
The conclusions about media and the Herald in the state report did not take into consideration some nuances and limitations unique to our county. Our coverage of all aspects of suicide warrants a discussion on a story-by-story basis, and we commit to being careful and responsible in our decisions.
Amy Maestas

Related Media
Suicide Prevention Report
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events