We all scream for ice cream

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We all scream for ice cream

Here’s the scoop on Durango’s hottest flavors
Elaine Matthews of Perth, Scotland, takes a cone of ice cream from an employee of Cold Stone Creamery on Thursday afternoon. At left is Matthews’ son Timothy, 11.
Three-year-old Carson Montgomery watches as an employee of Cold Stone Creamery scoops up cotton candy ice cream for him on Thursday afternoon. Montgomery is the son of Vince and Kim Montgomery of Norman, Okla.
Sara Knight, left, flips a scoop of ice cream up in the air while preparing an order at Cold Stone Creamery on Thursday afternoon. In back is Madeline Riegel.
Cosmopolitan’s chocolate peanut butter ice cream cake is made with layers of chocolate ice cream, peanut butter ice cream and cake.
Pastry chefs Alex Klinovsky, left, and Taylor Libby, prepare a chocolate peanut butter ice cream cake at Cosmopolitan restaurant on Friday.

We all scream for ice cream

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Elaine Matthews of Perth, Scotland, takes a cone of ice cream from an employee of Cold Stone Creamery on Thursday afternoon. At left is Matthews’ son Timothy, 11.
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Three-year-old Carson Montgomery watches as an employee of Cold Stone Creamery scoops up cotton candy ice cream for him on Thursday afternoon. Montgomery is the son of Vince and Kim Montgomery of Norman, Okla.
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Sara Knight, left, flips a scoop of ice cream up in the air while preparing an order at Cold Stone Creamery on Thursday afternoon. In back is Madeline Riegel.
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Cosmopolitan’s chocolate peanut butter ice cream cake is made with layers of chocolate ice cream, peanut butter ice cream and cake.
purchase
Pastry chefs Alex Klinovsky, left, and Taylor Libby, prepare a chocolate peanut butter ice cream cake at Cosmopolitan restaurant on Friday.
To make ice cream at home, first know your machine

A connoisseur of home-made ice cream, Marilee White frequently indulges in her favorite treat, preparing it in small batches with whatever fruit is in season. Conscious of ice cream’s bad rap for its high fat content, the petite dessert-lover practices portion control and replaces some of the cream with milk in her recipes.
“You need to experiment to your own taste finding the right balance between milk and cream,” White says.
“I like mine to be a 3:2 combo, using three parts whole milk to two parts heavy whipping cream.”
The richness of the ice cream depends on the ratio of cream to other ingredients, she said. You can be nutrition-conscious and still honor your preferences once you understand the fundamentals of making ice cream and adjust your recipes accordingly.
“Egg yolks act as a stabilizer,” she explains. “When these are added, the ice cream tends to be less icy, smoother, creamier and silkier.”
Over the years, White has learned how and when to add nuts, brandy and alcohol-infused fruits. Toasting nuts and coconut adds a complex layer of added flavor, she says. She’s combined pureed ingredients, adding chopped fresh fruit and berries during the final stretch of churning to keep the tasty morsels from becoming hard chunks of fruit ice.
White began making ice cream 30 years ago, when she purchased a Donvier ice cream machine, a classic, quart-size, double-walled bowl with a paddle churner. Unlike the hand-cranked or motorized old-fashioned ice cream makers, this type of ice cream machine does not require salt or bags of ice to chill the outer bowl. Instead, the bowl mechanism is stored in the freezer.
The trick to successful ice cream making is to freeze the cream contents and simultaneously churn or stir the mixture at a rate that keeps ice crystals from forming. Churning or stirring aerates the mixture, helping to achieve a smooth, silkier texture.
As the solution in the outer wall of the bowl thaws, the inner content – the ice cream mixture – freezes. The batch then is placed in a home freezer until it reaches the desired texture.
Ice cream machines differ. While White suggests experimentation, novices ought to follow recipes until they get a sense for how their own ice cream machine works. Numerous websites and blogs offer tips for newbies curious about making ice cream at home, but a good place to start is to read and follow the directions that come with the appliance.
“I like a pure dairy taste in my ice cream, but tastes differ. If your ice cream is too creamy, or too icy, you play with the combination of whole milk to cream until you reach the desired consistency,” White said.
Ice cream does not have to be a fat-laden treat. White offers a low-fat alternative in which plums, peaches and nectarines are combined with 2-percent milk and lemon or orange juice, then blended in a blender without egg yolks.
“Leave the skins on. That’s where the flavor is,” she says.
White makes sorbets and sherbets, too, using sugar-based simple syrups, juices and ripe fruit to create a variety of frozen confections.

Brandied Cherry Ice Cream

ingredients:
1 pound sweet or Bing cherries, pitted and halved
½ cup granulated sugar
½ cup cherry brandy such as Kirsch
3 cups whole milk
2 egg yolks
2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
¼ teaspoon almond extract
method:
Ice cream freezer container should be placed in freezer to chill overnight or according to manufacturer’s directions.
Combine cherries, brandy and sugar in bowl and let sit overnight.
Drain cherries, reserving liquid. Cook cherry liquid over medium heat about 10 minutes or long enough to thicken slightly. Set aside.
In saucepan, cook milk and slightly beaten egg yolks over low to medium heat, stirring constantly for 5 to 10 minutes or until mixture is thick enough to lightly coat a spoon.
Add cherry juice reduction to cooked milk mixture. Remove from heat. Add cream, vanilla and almond extract. Place on counter to cool to room temperature.
When cool, place in Donvier quart-size container and freeze until slush crystals form a ½-inch-thick layer on sides of container. Process (churn) for no more than 10 minutes or according to ice cream maker directions.
During final few minutes of churning, add cherries. Place in covered container in freezer and store for up to 3 weeks.
Recipe courtesy of Marilee White.

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