Deep in the Amazon, an indigenous culture is revived

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Southwest Life

Deep in the Amazon, an indigenous culture is revived

Peruvian family operates traditional healing center
Alberto Kiramo and Jessica Bertram discuss local plants near Parign Hak. Kiramo is holding the resident woolly monkey, Tyson, along with a bow and arrow made from the spiky palm tree, known locally as pijhuayo. The arrow tips and bows are made from wood. The string is made from cecropia bark, cotton and beeswax. The feathers are from wild turkey. 2018.
A small Ochroma spp. tree, also known as balsa, is used to treat string ray bites and grows in the dried river bed near Parign Hak. Sting rays are common in the Amazon and live in the upper Madre de Dios River.
Jose Chinipa, left, joins Alberto Kiramo and Vicky Corisepa for a traditional lunch in 2018. Parign Hak aims to have people to relearn and express cultural practices that are at risk of being lost.
Beroto Corisepa cares for his woolly monkey, Tyson, in 2018 at Parign Hak.
Steve Corisepa, center, talks with his mother, Vicky Corisepa, left, and Jessica Bertram in the conference room at Parign Hak. After treatment at Parign Hak, doctors cannot find any traces of tumors in Steve Corisepa’s brain and chest.
Vicky Corisepa shows how to remove the bark from an asukme tree (Poulsenia armata), which can be used to make clothing and blankets at Parign Hak 2018.

Deep in the Amazon, an indigenous culture is revived

Alberto Kiramo and Jessica Bertram discuss local plants near Parign Hak. Kiramo is holding the resident woolly monkey, Tyson, along with a bow and arrow made from the spiky palm tree, known locally as pijhuayo. The arrow tips and bows are made from wood. The string is made from cecropia bark, cotton and beeswax. The feathers are from wild turkey. 2018.
A small Ochroma spp. tree, also known as balsa, is used to treat string ray bites and grows in the dried river bed near Parign Hak. Sting rays are common in the Amazon and live in the upper Madre de Dios River.
Jose Chinipa, left, joins Alberto Kiramo and Vicky Corisepa for a traditional lunch in 2018. Parign Hak aims to have people to relearn and express cultural practices that are at risk of being lost.
Beroto Corisepa cares for his woolly monkey, Tyson, in 2018 at Parign Hak.
Steve Corisepa, center, talks with his mother, Vicky Corisepa, left, and Jessica Bertram in the conference room at Parign Hak. After treatment at Parign Hak, doctors cannot find any traces of tumors in Steve Corisepa’s brain and chest.
Vicky Corisepa shows how to remove the bark from an asukme tree (Poulsenia armata), which can be used to make clothing and blankets at Parign Hak 2018.
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