Town by town, local journalism is dying in plain sight

News

Town by town, local journalism is dying in plain sight

Facebook blogger Darrell Todd Maurina says journalists need to go back to the basics to survive, or revive, in small-town America.
The old Daily Guide office stands for sale in February in St. Robert, Mo. With the shutdown of the newspaper in September 2018, this area in central Missouri’s Ozark hills joined more than 1,400 other cities across the United States to lose a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the University North Carolina.
This Feb. 20 photo shows a microfilm copy of the Daily Guide at the library in Waynesville, Mo. With the shutdown of the Daily Guide in September 2018, this town of 5,200 people in central Missouri’s Ozark hills joined more than 1,400 other cities across the United States to lose a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the University North Carolina.
Pulaski County Sheriff Jimmy Bench stands outside city hall in February in Waynesville, Mo. For painful, personal reasons, Bench wishes the Daily Guide was there to report on the December death of his 31-year-old son, Ryan, because of a heroin overdose. It would have been better than dealing with whispers and Twitter. “Social media is so cruel sometimes,” Bench said.
Natalie Sanders speaks during an interview Feb. 20 in St. Robert, Mo. In the spring 2018, the Daily Guide was cut from five to three days a week. In June, Sanders, its editor and last newsroom staffer, quit – she was burned out, she said. The last edition was published three months later, on Sept. 7. “It felt like an old friend died. ... I sat and I cried, I really did. Because being the editor of the Daily Guide was all I wanted for a really long time.”
Mayor Luge Hardman talks with reporters Feb. 20 at City Hall in Waynesville, Mo. Five of Waynesville’s eight city council members are former military, and Hardman says the meetings run efficiently as a result.
Old copies of the Uranus Examiner are stacked in the paper’s office near St. Robert, Mo. Only six editions of the paper were printed.
A rock outcropping painted by a local tattoo artist to resemble a frog greets visitors who follow the old Route 66 into Waynesville, Mo., on Wednesday.

Town by town, local journalism is dying in plain sight

Facebook blogger Darrell Todd Maurina says journalists need to go back to the basics to survive, or revive, in small-town America.
The old Daily Guide office stands for sale in February in St. Robert, Mo. With the shutdown of the newspaper in September 2018, this area in central Missouri’s Ozark hills joined more than 1,400 other cities across the United States to lose a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the University North Carolina.
This Feb. 20 photo shows a microfilm copy of the Daily Guide at the library in Waynesville, Mo. With the shutdown of the Daily Guide in September 2018, this town of 5,200 people in central Missouri’s Ozark hills joined more than 1,400 other cities across the United States to lose a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the University North Carolina.
Pulaski County Sheriff Jimmy Bench stands outside city hall in February in Waynesville, Mo. For painful, personal reasons, Bench wishes the Daily Guide was there to report on the December death of his 31-year-old son, Ryan, because of a heroin overdose. It would have been better than dealing with whispers and Twitter. “Social media is so cruel sometimes,” Bench said.
Natalie Sanders speaks during an interview Feb. 20 in St. Robert, Mo. In the spring 2018, the Daily Guide was cut from five to three days a week. In June, Sanders, its editor and last newsroom staffer, quit – she was burned out, she said. The last edition was published three months later, on Sept. 7. “It felt like an old friend died. ... I sat and I cried, I really did. Because being the editor of the Daily Guide was all I wanted for a really long time.”
Mayor Luge Hardman talks with reporters Feb. 20 at City Hall in Waynesville, Mo. Five of Waynesville’s eight city council members are former military, and Hardman says the meetings run efficiently as a result.
Old copies of the Uranus Examiner are stacked in the paper’s office near St. Robert, Mo. Only six editions of the paper were printed.
A rock outcropping painted by a local tattoo artist to resemble a frog greets visitors who follow the old Route 66 into Waynesville, Mo., on Wednesday.
click here to add your event
Area Events