There's nothing mysterious about Turkish food

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There's nothing mysterious about Turkish food

One of the world's great cuisines happens to be one of the world's simplest
Haruynisa teaches Turkish cooking classes in her home in Cappadocia, a region in the central part of the country. A 60-something grandmother, she says there is nothing to demystify about her native country's cuisine. “We like the familiar,” she said through an interpreter.
Maras pepper flakes are moderately hot. But don’t foresake them for fear of heat. The spice is a staple ingredient in Turkish cuisine.
Stuffed green bell peppers make up Turkish Dolmas. In many parts of the world, people think of Dolmas as stuffed grape leaves. But in central Anatolia, the dish refers to stuffed vegetables.
To make Sarmas, or stuffed grape leaves, place the rough side down. Place the filling horizontally in the middle before rolling them into cigar-like shapes.
Hayrunisa, a 60-something grandmother who lives in Göreme, Turkey, teaches foreigners how to make halwa. It’s a molasses-based dessert.
The filling can be the same for grape leaves and green bell peppers. Depending on how many you make, you can put both stuffed food in the same sauce pan to steam on the stovetop.
Fresh mint decorates steamed Dolmas and Sarmas. Taking a Turkish cuisine cooking class in Cappadocia means learning that one fo the world’s great foods is accessible, affordable and tasty.
Hayrunisa, who teaches Turkish cooking classes in Göreme, Turkey, chopes fresh mint to add to red lentil soup. In Turkey, even dried mint carries a flavor equal to the fresh herb.
When making Dolmas, fold each side of the grape leaf in to the center. Don’t overlap much. Then fold the bottom up and finish by rolling the filled leaf into a cigar shape. Rolling it too loose means the filling will spill out; rolling it to tight will tear the leaf.

There's nothing mysterious about Turkish food

Haruynisa teaches Turkish cooking classes in her home in Cappadocia, a region in the central part of the country. A 60-something grandmother, she says there is nothing to demystify about her native country's cuisine. “We like the familiar,” she said through an interpreter.
Maras pepper flakes are moderately hot. But don’t foresake them for fear of heat. The spice is a staple ingredient in Turkish cuisine.
Stuffed green bell peppers make up Turkish Dolmas. In many parts of the world, people think of Dolmas as stuffed grape leaves. But in central Anatolia, the dish refers to stuffed vegetables.
To make Sarmas, or stuffed grape leaves, place the rough side down. Place the filling horizontally in the middle before rolling them into cigar-like shapes.
Hayrunisa, a 60-something grandmother who lives in Göreme, Turkey, teaches foreigners how to make halwa. It’s a molasses-based dessert.
The filling can be the same for grape leaves and green bell peppers. Depending on how many you make, you can put both stuffed food in the same sauce pan to steam on the stovetop.
Fresh mint decorates steamed Dolmas and Sarmas. Taking a Turkish cuisine cooking class in Cappadocia means learning that one fo the world’s great foods is accessible, affordable and tasty.
Hayrunisa, who teaches Turkish cooking classes in Göreme, Turkey, chopes fresh mint to add to red lentil soup. In Turkey, even dried mint carries a flavor equal to the fresh herb.
When making Dolmas, fold each side of the grape leaf in to the center. Don’t overlap much. Then fold the bottom up and finish by rolling the filled leaf into a cigar shape. Rolling it too loose means the filling will spill out; rolling it to tight will tear the leaf.
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