From the skies, geologists peer inside the Earth

News

From the skies, geologists peer inside the Earth

Project aims to map underground at Silverton Superfund site
Oscar Gomez, left, a system operator, and Adolf Masiyandima, crew leader, both with Geotech Ltd., prepare the Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site. The system is carried by a high-altitude performance helicopter.
Oscar Gomez, a system operator with Geotech Ltd., starts a device that measures the Earth’s ever-changing magnetic field. The Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system is being used to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site.
Adolf Masiyandima, crew leader with Geotech Ltd., prepares the Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site. The system is a large wire loop 60 feet in diameter carried below a helicopter.

From the skies, geologists peer inside the Earth

Oscar Gomez, left, a system operator, and Adolf Masiyandima, crew leader, both with Geotech Ltd., prepare the Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site. The system is carried by a high-altitude performance helicopter.
Oscar Gomez, a system operator with Geotech Ltd., starts a device that measures the Earth’s ever-changing magnetic field. The Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system is being used to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site.
Adolf Masiyandima, crew leader with Geotech Ltd., prepares the Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site. The system is a large wire loop 60 feet in diameter carried below a helicopter.

From the skies, geologists peer inside the Earth

The U.S. Geological Survey is contracting a helicopter carrying a large wire loop to map the subsurface of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site. The survey will help inform the Environmental Protection Agency in conducting future cleanup operations. The electromagnetic system records the geologic makeup of the Earth.

From the skies, geologists peer inside the Earth

Adolf Masiyandima, crew leader with Geotech Ltd., buckles in as Aaron Gillingham, a pilot for Access Helicopters, prepares to take off in Silverton during a U.S. Geological Survey project to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site.

From the skies, geologists peer inside the Earth

Oscar Gomez, a system operator with Geotech Ltd., starts the magnetic base station recently in Silverton that is used to monitor magnetic changes throughout the day. It gives a baseline of magnetic data that works with the Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system, which is being used to map the geological makeup of the Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site.

From the skies, geologists peer inside the Earth

Pilot Aaron Gillingham, with Access Helicopters from British Columbia under contract with Goetech Ltd., carries the 850-pound Versatile Time Domain Electromagnetic system, which can map the geologic makeup of the Earth.
Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Area Events