It’s the hardest job they’ll ever love

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It’s the hardest job they’ll ever love

Locomotive’s fireman shovels 5 tons of coal to get to Silverton and back
Isaac Randolph, a fireman with Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, throws a shovelful of coal into the furnace of the locomotive Monday as the engineer drives the train.
A fiery glow from the locomotive furnace lights up the face of Isaac Randolph, a fireman with Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad. The burning coal in the train’s engines creates a fire that reaches 190 degrees.
The fireman’s shovel rests on the coal car before it will be used to move tons of coal.
Isaac Randolph, a Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad fireman, checks the tracks before leaving the Rockwood station on the way to Silverton.
Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad locomotive 480 tows a coal car to Silverton after stopping in Rockwood. Fireman Isaac Randolph spent the day shoveling coal, the engine’s fuel.
Isaac Randolph, a fireman with Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad wraps up his day of shoveling coal on the train. “I love it,” he said about his job.
Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad trains use 5 tons of coal for each round-trip to Silverton.
Isaac Randolph closely listens to and watches the engine gauges on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge to get a feel of how the engine is running.
Some of the five tons of coal that is shoveled into the furnace of the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad locomotive.
Isaac Randolph, a fireman with the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, shovels coal into the train engine’s firebox every 15 seconds when the train in going up a steep hill. Train firemen are responsible for keeping tons of coal in engines each day for fuel. The locomotives are 100 percent coal-fired and steam-operated.

It’s the hardest job they’ll ever love

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Isaac Randolph, a fireman with Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, throws a shovelful of coal into the furnace of the locomotive Monday as the engineer drives the train.
Purchase
A fiery glow from the locomotive furnace lights up the face of Isaac Randolph, a fireman with Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad. The burning coal in the train’s engines creates a fire that reaches 190 degrees.
Purchase
The fireman’s shovel rests on the coal car before it will be used to move tons of coal.
Purchase
Isaac Randolph, a Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad fireman, checks the tracks before leaving the Rockwood station on the way to Silverton.
Purchase
Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad locomotive 480 tows a coal car to Silverton after stopping in Rockwood. Fireman Isaac Randolph spent the day shoveling coal, the engine’s fuel.
Purchase
Isaac Randolph, a fireman with Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad wraps up his day of shoveling coal on the train. “I love it,” he said about his job.
Purchase
Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad trains use 5 tons of coal for each round-trip to Silverton.
Purchase
Isaac Randolph closely listens to and watches the engine gauges on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge to get a feel of how the engine is running.
Purchase
Some of the five tons of coal that is shoveled into the furnace of the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad locomotive.
Purchase
Isaac Randolph, a fireman with the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, shovels coal into the train engine’s firebox every 15 seconds when the train in going up a steep hill. Train firemen are responsible for keeping tons of coal in engines each day for fuel. The locomotives are 100 percent coal-fired and steam-operated.
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