Durango preschool grows the youngest gardeners

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Durango preschool grows the youngest gardeners

Riverhouse adds hands-on lessons about nutrition, growing process
Harley Funk, 4, digs in the Riverhouse Children’s Center garden, which includes lettuce, tomatoes, radishes and carrots. While the garden is fun for the kids, it’s providing healthy nutrition and experiential learning, too.
Angie Downing, a teacher at Riverhouse Children’s Center, works with children in their garden. One of the reasons for gardening with such young children is teaching healthy lifestyle habits and combating childhood obesity – more than 20 percent of children younger than 5 are overweight.
Gunner Winters, 4, holds a tomato that he collected from the Riverhouse Children’s Center garden.
Archer Nicovich, 4, shows off the colorful gloves kids get to wear while working in the Riverhouse Children’s Center garden. While gardening and mucking in the dirt are great fun for kids, adults use it to teach healthy nutrition choices and lessons about germination and pollination.
Child-sized garden tools at Riverhouse Children’s Center make it easy for small hands to tend to their crop, which includes lettuce, tomatoes, radishes and carrots.
Angie Downing, a teacher at Riverhouse Children’s Center, works with children in the center’s garden. The garden provides healthy nutrition and a chance to see germination, pollination and other botanical principles in action.

Durango preschool grows the youngest gardeners

Harley Funk, 4, digs in the Riverhouse Children’s Center garden, which includes lettuce, tomatoes, radishes and carrots. While the garden is fun for the kids, it’s providing healthy nutrition and experiential learning, too.
Angie Downing, a teacher at Riverhouse Children’s Center, works with children in their garden. One of the reasons for gardening with such young children is teaching healthy lifestyle habits and combating childhood obesity – more than 20 percent of children younger than 5 are overweight.
Gunner Winters, 4, holds a tomato that he collected from the Riverhouse Children’s Center garden.
Archer Nicovich, 4, shows off the colorful gloves kids get to wear while working in the Riverhouse Children’s Center garden. While gardening and mucking in the dirt are great fun for kids, adults use it to teach healthy nutrition choices and lessons about germination and pollination.
Child-sized garden tools at Riverhouse Children’s Center make it easy for small hands to tend to their crop, which includes lettuce, tomatoes, radishes and carrots.
Angie Downing, a teacher at Riverhouse Children’s Center, works with children in the center’s garden. The garden provides healthy nutrition and a chance to see germination, pollination and other botanical principles in action.
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