Greenland: Big piece of the ice puzzle

Greenland: Big piece of the ice puzzle

Researchers look for clues to our future
Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
Attached by rope to a waiting helicopter, researcher Carl Gladish walks back after deploying a GPS seismometer, or GeoPebble, to track glacial movement on Jakobshavn Glacier. Researchers hope to eventually deploy scores of the devices to measure ice loss in Greenland.
Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
How much Greenland’s melting ice may raise sea levels is the focus of many researchers.
Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
The “big house” is the main building at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The structure is periodically jacked up on its support columns to stay above accumulating snow.
Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
A floating iceberg is the result of ice streaming toward the sea, in some places at a rate of 100 feet a day, twice as fast as in the 1990s.

Greenland: Big piece of the ice puzzle

Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
Attached by rope to a waiting helicopter, researcher Carl Gladish walks back after deploying a GPS seismometer, or GeoPebble, to track glacial movement on Jakobshavn Glacier. Researchers hope to eventually deploy scores of the devices to measure ice loss in Greenland.
Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
How much Greenland’s melting ice may raise sea levels is the focus of many researchers.
Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
The “big house” is the main building at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The structure is periodically jacked up on its support columns to stay above accumulating snow.
Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
A floating iceberg is the result of ice streaming toward the sea, in some places at a rate of 100 feet a day, twice as fast as in the 1990s.
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