Historic business signs buck a politically correct world

Historic business signs buck a politically correct world

Iconic signs attract customers and the famous
The Chief, which once led the hungry to a diner at Main Avenue and 21st Street in Durango, is now situated on Ninth Street across from the Toh-Atin Gallery.
Giant arrows, put in place around The Hogan, just west of Mancos on Highway 160, in the early 1980s, were inspired by Route 66 advertising of the ’50s and ’60s.
Judy Countess, left; Bill Countess, and Emily Brown have owned and operated The Hogan, west of Mancos, for 32 years.
The Chief Diner in Durango is featured in an old postcard.

Historic business signs buck a politically correct world

The Chief, which once led the hungry to a diner at Main Avenue and 21st Street in Durango, is now situated on Ninth Street across from the Toh-Atin Gallery.
Giant arrows, put in place around The Hogan, just west of Mancos on Highway 160, in the early 1980s, were inspired by Route 66 advertising of the ’50s and ’60s.
Judy Countess, left; Bill Countess, and Emily Brown have owned and operated The Hogan, west of Mancos, for 32 years.
The Chief Diner in Durango is featured in an old postcard.
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