Brazil transgender soccer team fights prejudice

Brazil transgender soccer team fights prejudice

In this May 13, 2019 photo, transgender Caua Fraga, 23, shows the tattoo on his chest that reads in Portuguese "Resistance", before a training session with the Bigtboys transgender men's football team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the two dozen Bigtboys players, the training pitch is also one of the few places where they feel at ease and can talk about their experiences, good and bad, without fear. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Daniel de Farias Viana leaves the field with his girlfriend's son after playing a soccer game with his transgender men's team BigTboys, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. BigTboys, Alligaytors and other LGBT teams that have formed across Brazil, are using the nation’s love of soccer to play while fighting prejudice despite a growing conservative tide. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, Apollo Henrique stretches during a practice session with the Bigtboys, a transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With only four months of weekly training in the bag, the Bigtboys lost 9-1 to the more established Alligaytors. But just being on the field was unusually liberating to players on a team that bills itself as Rio de Janeiro’s first transgender men’s football club. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, girlfriends and friends watch a soccer game between the Bigtboys transgender men's team and the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With only four months of weekly training in the bag, the Bigtboys lost 9-1 to the more established Alligaytors. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bruno dos Santos watches a soccer game between his Bigtboys transgender men's team and the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the two dozen Bigtboys players, the pitch is also one of the few places where they feel at ease and can talk about their experiences, good and bad, without fear. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, Daniel de Farias Viana stretches during a practice session with his transgender, men's soccer team Bigtboys in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The rights group Transgender Europe said 167 transgender men and women were killed last year in Brazil, making the country one of the world’s most dangerous for transgender people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019, a player with the transgender men's Bigtboys soccer team walks past a poster of soccer stars Neymar, Ronaldo, and Messi, inside an athletic dressing room in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. No laws specifically protect the country’s large LGBT community, though many have celebrated a Supreme Federal Court ruling stating that a law against racism also shields gay and trans people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, girlfriends and friends watch their loved ones play on the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team during a match against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team n Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. BigTboys, Alligaytors and other LGBT teams that have formed across Brazil, are using the nation’s love of soccer to play while fighting prejudice despite a growing conservative tide. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this June 4, 2019 photo, Daniel de Farias Viana prepares to leave home for soccer practice in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Bills in Brazil's Congress to outlaw homophobia have faced fierce opposition from an ever-growing number of conservative and evangelical lawmakers. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, a player trains with the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the Bigtboys, a Supreme Court ruling in favor of same-sex unions in 2011, isn’t a solution in itself, but a symbolic win, nevertheless. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, Caua Fraga kicks the ball during a practice session with the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The rise of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and a socially conservative wave has alarmed the LGBT community, including the Bigtboys. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, soccer players from the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team get ready in their locker room in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. BigTboys, Alligaytors and other LGBT teams that have formed across Brazil, are using the nation’s love of soccer to play while fighting prejudice despite a growing conservative tide. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bernardo Pereira, 23, left, kisses his girlfriend on the sidelines of a game played by the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The rights group Transgender Europe said 167 transgender men and women were killed last year in Brazil, making the country one of the world’s most dangerous for transgender people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bruno Pereira prepares to kick during a pause at a soccer match between his team, the Bigtboys transgender men's team against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. No laws specifically protect the country’s large LGBT community, though many have celebrated a Supreme Federal Court ruling stating that a law against racism also shields gay and trans people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
EDS NOTE: NUDITY - In this June 4, 2019 photo, Robert Ismerim de Souza poses for a photo about one month after breast removal surgery, on the sidelines of soccer practice with the Bigtboys transgender men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “It was always a crime. We just did not have that kind of visibility; we were hidden,” said Ismerim, noting that not too long ago, gay and transgender people were considered as mentally ill. “It’s not that I don’t feel scared anymore, but now I know that the state is on our side. We can live; before we were only surviving.” (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bigtboys transgender men's soccer player Bruno dos Santos, center, and his teammates listen to their coach during a game against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “Despite dozens of bills, only homophobic and transphobic discrimination remains without any kind of (legal sanction),” Supreme Court Justice Alexandre de Moraes said during a session in February. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Kaue Mendonca, right, jokes with his girlfriend on the sidelines of his Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team game against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the two dozen Bigtboys players, the pitch is also one of the few places where they feel at ease and can talk about their experiences, good and bad, without fear. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Cristian Lins Silva, left, the founder of the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team, takes a picture of the team's flag after his team's game against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “I had enough of knocking on doors asking for help and not getting anything.” The 45-year-old photojournalist ran for state representative in Rio de Janeiro last year. He didn’t win, and a few months ago, decided to put together the soccer team. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

Brazil transgender soccer team fights prejudice

In this May 13, 2019 photo, transgender Caua Fraga, 23, shows the tattoo on his chest that reads in Portuguese "Resistance", before a training session with the Bigtboys transgender men's football team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the two dozen Bigtboys players, the training pitch is also one of the few places where they feel at ease and can talk about their experiences, good and bad, without fear. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Daniel de Farias Viana leaves the field with his girlfriend's son after playing a soccer game with his transgender men's team BigTboys, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. BigTboys, Alligaytors and other LGBT teams that have formed across Brazil, are using the nation’s love of soccer to play while fighting prejudice despite a growing conservative tide. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, Apollo Henrique stretches during a practice session with the Bigtboys, a transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With only four months of weekly training in the bag, the Bigtboys lost 9-1 to the more established Alligaytors. But just being on the field was unusually liberating to players on a team that bills itself as Rio de Janeiro’s first transgender men’s football club. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, girlfriends and friends watch a soccer game between the Bigtboys transgender men's team and the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With only four months of weekly training in the bag, the Bigtboys lost 9-1 to the more established Alligaytors. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bruno dos Santos watches a soccer game between his Bigtboys transgender men's team and the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the two dozen Bigtboys players, the pitch is also one of the few places where they feel at ease and can talk about their experiences, good and bad, without fear. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, Daniel de Farias Viana stretches during a practice session with his transgender, men's soccer team Bigtboys in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The rights group Transgender Europe said 167 transgender men and women were killed last year in Brazil, making the country one of the world’s most dangerous for transgender people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019, a player with the transgender men's Bigtboys soccer team walks past a poster of soccer stars Neymar, Ronaldo, and Messi, inside an athletic dressing room in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. No laws specifically protect the country’s large LGBT community, though many have celebrated a Supreme Federal Court ruling stating that a law against racism also shields gay and trans people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, girlfriends and friends watch their loved ones play on the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team during a match against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team n Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. BigTboys, Alligaytors and other LGBT teams that have formed across Brazil, are using the nation’s love of soccer to play while fighting prejudice despite a growing conservative tide. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this June 4, 2019 photo, Daniel de Farias Viana prepares to leave home for soccer practice in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Bills in Brazil's Congress to outlaw homophobia have faced fierce opposition from an ever-growing number of conservative and evangelical lawmakers. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, a player trains with the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the Bigtboys, a Supreme Court ruling in favor of same-sex unions in 2011, isn’t a solution in itself, but a symbolic win, nevertheless. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 13, 2019 photo, Caua Fraga kicks the ball during a practice session with the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The rise of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and a socially conservative wave has alarmed the LGBT community, including the Bigtboys. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, soccer players from the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team get ready in their locker room in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. BigTboys, Alligaytors and other LGBT teams that have formed across Brazil, are using the nation’s love of soccer to play while fighting prejudice despite a growing conservative tide. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bernardo Pereira, 23, left, kisses his girlfriend on the sidelines of a game played by the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The rights group Transgender Europe said 167 transgender men and women were killed last year in Brazil, making the country one of the world’s most dangerous for transgender people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bruno Pereira prepares to kick during a pause at a soccer match between his team, the Bigtboys transgender men's team against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. No laws specifically protect the country’s large LGBT community, though many have celebrated a Supreme Federal Court ruling stating that a law against racism also shields gay and trans people. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
EDS NOTE: NUDITY - In this June 4, 2019 photo, Robert Ismerim de Souza poses for a photo about one month after breast removal surgery, on the sidelines of soccer practice with the Bigtboys transgender men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “It was always a crime. We just did not have that kind of visibility; we were hidden,” said Ismerim, noting that not too long ago, gay and transgender people were considered as mentally ill. “It’s not that I don’t feel scared anymore, but now I know that the state is on our side. We can live; before we were only surviving.” (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Bigtboys transgender men's soccer player Bruno dos Santos, center, and his teammates listen to their coach during a game against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “Despite dozens of bills, only homophobic and transphobic discrimination remains without any kind of (legal sanction),” Supreme Court Justice Alexandre de Moraes said during a session in February. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Kaue Mendonca, right, jokes with his girlfriend on the sidelines of his Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team game against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For the two dozen Bigtboys players, the pitch is also one of the few places where they feel at ease and can talk about their experiences, good and bad, without fear. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
In this May 27, 2019 photo, Cristian Lins Silva, left, the founder of the Bigtboys transgender men's soccer team, takes a picture of the team's flag after his team's game against the Alligaytors, a gay men's team in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “I had enough of knocking on doors asking for help and not getting anything.” The 45-year-old photojournalist ran for state representative in Rio de Janeiro last year. He didn’t win, and a few months ago, decided to put together the soccer team. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
click here to add your event
Area Events