A powerful piece of history

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A powerful piece of history

Tacoma hydroelectric plant producing green energy for 100-plus years
Just another day at the office for Jeffery Wilbanks, operations and maintenance specialist with Exel Power, except his is the Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood. His commute takes a fifteen minute ride in a track car on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad tracks to get to the power plant.
Two of the three original generating units at Tacoma are operating today. The third original unit blew up in 1949 and was replaced. There is room for a fourth.
Xcel Energy maintenance workers often have the century-old plant to themselves. Jeff Wilbanks, left, plant operations and maintenance specialist, and Alfred Hughes, supervisor of hydro operations, both with Xcel, are in charge of the controls.
The Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood was built to supply electricity to the area. Taking water from Cascade Creek, it travels via a wooden flume and pipes to the plant, drives the generators and empties into the Animas River.
A 10 foot in diameter steel pipe carries water from Electra Lake north of Durango to power the generators at Tacoma.
The diversion dam on Cascade Creek carries the water from the creek via a wooden flume to Electra Lake.
Electra Lake north of Durango was built to contain water from Cascade Creek and power the generators at Tacoma.
Jeffery Wilbanks, operations and maintenance specialist with Exel Energy, drives a track car to the Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood where he works.
The Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood was built to supply electricity to the area. Homes were built to house the workers who built the project and have worked at the plant over the years.
Inside of one of the two houses that are left at the Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood.
Water flows into the Animas River after turning the turbines to create power in the Tacoma plant.
The Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood was built along the banks of the Animas River in 1905.

A powerful piece of history

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Just another day at the office for Jeffery Wilbanks, operations and maintenance specialist with Exel Power, except his is the Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood. His commute takes a fifteen minute ride in a track car on the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad tracks to get to the power plant.
purchase
Two of the three original generating units at Tacoma are operating today. The third original unit blew up in 1949 and was replaced. There is room for a fourth.
purchase
Xcel Energy maintenance workers often have the century-old plant to themselves. Jeff Wilbanks, left, plant operations and maintenance specialist, and Alfred Hughes, supervisor of hydro operations, both with Xcel, are in charge of the controls.
purchase
The Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood was built to supply electricity to the area. Taking water from Cascade Creek, it travels via a wooden flume and pipes to the plant, drives the generators and empties into the Animas River.
purchase
A 10 foot in diameter steel pipe carries water from Electra Lake north of Durango to power the generators at Tacoma.
purchase
The diversion dam on Cascade Creek carries the water from the creek via a wooden flume to Electra Lake.
purchase
Electra Lake north of Durango was built to contain water from Cascade Creek and power the generators at Tacoma.
Purchase
Jeffery Wilbanks, operations and maintenance specialist with Exel Energy, drives a track car to the Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood where he works.
purchase
The Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood was built to supply electricity to the area. Homes were built to house the workers who built the project and have worked at the plant over the years.
purchase
Inside of one of the two houses that are left at the Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood.
Purchase
Water flows into the Animas River after turning the turbines to create power in the Tacoma plant.
purchase
The Tacoma Power plant north of Rockwood was built along the banks of the Animas River in 1905.
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