Colorado pediatricians prescribe books to promote wellness

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Colorado pediatricians prescribe books to promote wellness

A prescription to read leads to increased literacy
Six-month-old Mason Romero is clearly intrigued by his new book presented to him during a wellness visit to Dr. Pakhi Chaudhuri, right, as part of the Reach Out and Read Colorado program promoting early childhood literacy. Mason is the son of Mellissa and Walter Romero.
Six-month-old Mason Romero is distracted by his new book, Animals, while Dr. Pakhi Chaudhuri performs a wellness check. Mason is the son of Mellissa and Walter Romero.
Six-month-old Mason Romero takes a close look at a book presented to him during a wellness visit to Dr. Pakhi Chaudhuri, right, as part of the Reach Out and Read Colorado program. Children up to the age of 5 receive an age-appropriate book at every wellness visit to promote early childhood literacy. Mason is the son of Mellissa and Walter Romero.

Colorado pediatricians prescribe books to promote wellness

Six-month-old Mason Romero is clearly intrigued by his new book presented to him during a wellness visit to Dr. Pakhi Chaudhuri, right, as part of the Reach Out and Read Colorado program promoting early childhood literacy. Mason is the son of Mellissa and Walter Romero.
Six-month-old Mason Romero is distracted by his new book, Animals, while Dr. Pakhi Chaudhuri performs a wellness check. Mason is the son of Mellissa and Walter Romero.
Six-month-old Mason Romero takes a close look at a book presented to him during a wellness visit to Dr. Pakhi Chaudhuri, right, as part of the Reach Out and Read Colorado program. Children up to the age of 5 receive an age-appropriate book at every wellness visit to promote early childhood literacy. Mason is the son of Mellissa and Walter Romero.
Talking matters, too

The number is staggering: By the time a child of professional parents is 3, she will have heard 32 million words more than a contemporary whose parents are lower income. That’s a number that can never be made up, research has found, with the gap increasing every year the child is in school.
The difference is apparent by the time a child reaches 18 months of age, a study by Stanford University professors found two years ago. The study found putting children in front of a television show or video doesn’t create a brain that absorbs new vocabulary. It takes speaking or reading directly to the child.
The good news? They also found that lower-income parents underestimate the richness of their own vocabularies and can improve their children’s exposure to new words just by understanding that talking to children matters – and doing it.

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