More people are collecting mushrooms – is that a problem?

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More people are collecting mushrooms – is that a problem?

Harvesting the wild fungi is growing in popularity, foresters say
Forest Service officials say more people are out collecting mushrooms as they become more comfortable identifying edible mushrooms from poisonous ones.
The Forest Service says picking mushrooms does not affect their overall population. Because mushrooms’ main root system is underground, they are not damaged in the collection process. This is a coral mushroom.
A puff ball mushroom in the Rio Grande National Forest is seen after the West Fork Fire burned through the area in 2013.
Courtesy of Chris Ricci

Mushrooms play an integral role in the ecosystem, said Chris Ricci with Majesty Mushrooms. Here, Boletus edulis grow on a tree stump.
Courtesy of Chris Ricci

Forest Service officials urge people collecting mushrooms to leave some for the next people on the hunt. Pictured here is Amanita rubescens.

More people are collecting mushrooms – is that a problem?

Forest Service officials say more people are out collecting mushrooms as they become more comfortable identifying edible mushrooms from poisonous ones.
The Forest Service says picking mushrooms does not affect their overall population. Because mushrooms’ main root system is underground, they are not damaged in the collection process. This is a coral mushroom.
A puff ball mushroom in the Rio Grande National Forest is seen after the West Fork Fire burned through the area in 2013.
Courtesy of Chris Ricci

Mushrooms play an integral role in the ecosystem, said Chris Ricci with Majesty Mushrooms. Here, Boletus edulis grow on a tree stump.
Courtesy of Chris Ricci

Forest Service officials urge people collecting mushrooms to leave some for the next people on the hunt. Pictured here is Amanita rubescens.
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