Virtual reality used to highlight uranium contamination on Navajo Nation

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Virtual reality used to highlight uranium contamination on Navajo Nation

Audience members try out virtual reality headsets to watch “Ways of Knowing,” which was directed by artist Kayla Briet, at the El Morro Events Center in Gallup, N.M. Briet and other activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Cheyenne Yazzi hugs her puppy while her mother, Selina, pulls weeds in their backyard in Church Rock, N.M. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Teddy Nez stands on his property adjacent to the Northeast Church Rock Mine in 2008 in northwestern N.M. Behind him is a 50-foot uranium waste pile from mining operations. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Filmmakers Carmile Garcia, left, and Kayla Briet use a 360 VR cameras on Mount Taylor, regarded by the Navajo as one of four sacred mountains. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Filmmakers Carmile Garcia, left, and Kayla Briet use a 360 VR cameras in Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness area in N.M. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.

Virtual reality used to highlight uranium contamination on Navajo Nation

Audience members try out virtual reality headsets to watch “Ways of Knowing,” which was directed by artist Kayla Briet, at the El Morro Events Center in Gallup, N.M. Briet and other activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Cheyenne Yazzi hugs her puppy while her mother, Selina, pulls weeds in their backyard in Church Rock, N.M. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Teddy Nez stands on his property adjacent to the Northeast Church Rock Mine in 2008 in northwestern N.M. Behind him is a 50-foot uranium waste pile from mining operations. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Filmmakers Carmile Garcia, left, and Kayla Briet use a 360 VR cameras on Mount Taylor, regarded by the Navajo as one of four sacred mountains. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
Filmmakers Carmile Garcia, left, and Kayla Briet use a 360 VR cameras in Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness area in N.M. Activists are using virtual reality technology to tell the story of a uranium mine spill on the Navajo Nation.
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