Australia’s iconic rock Uluru scaled by final climbers

Southwest Life

Australia’s iconic rock Uluru scaled by final climbers

Tourists line up waiting to climb the sandstone monolith called Uluru that dominates Australia’s arid center at Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019, the last day climbing is allowed. The end of visitors enjoying the panoramic views of the incongruously flat Outback surrounds from the rock’s summit also marks indigenous Australians finding a new voice in national decision-making.
The sun rises over Uluru, Australia. A climbing ban from late Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 on the sandstone monolith called Uluru that dominates Australia’s arid center marks indigenous Australians finding a new voice in national decision-making. The rock has long been celebrated as a prized peak to conquer and a sacred site to be revered, but with the ban, the pendulum is swinging decisively toward the rock’s cultural significance to its traditional owners.
People sit on camp chairs at a popular viewing point to watch the sunset on Uluru, Australia. A climbing ban from late Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 on the sandstone monolith called Uluru that dominates Australia’s arid center marks indigenous Australians finding a new voice in national decision-making. The rock has long been celebrated as a prized peak to conquer and a sacred site to be revered, but with the ban, the pendulum is swinging decisively toward the rock’s cultural significance to its traditional owners.

Australia’s iconic rock Uluru scaled by final climbers

Tourists line up waiting to climb the sandstone monolith called Uluru that dominates Australia’s arid center at Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019, the last day climbing is allowed. The end of visitors enjoying the panoramic views of the incongruously flat Outback surrounds from the rock’s summit also marks indigenous Australians finding a new voice in national decision-making.
The sun rises over Uluru, Australia. A climbing ban from late Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 on the sandstone monolith called Uluru that dominates Australia’s arid center marks indigenous Australians finding a new voice in national decision-making. The rock has long been celebrated as a prized peak to conquer and a sacred site to be revered, but with the ban, the pendulum is swinging decisively toward the rock’s cultural significance to its traditional owners.
People sit on camp chairs at a popular viewing point to watch the sunset on Uluru, Australia. A climbing ban from late Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 on the sandstone monolith called Uluru that dominates Australia’s arid center marks indigenous Australians finding a new voice in national decision-making. The rock has long been celebrated as a prized peak to conquer and a sacred site to be revered, but with the ban, the pendulum is swinging decisively toward the rock’s cultural significance to its traditional owners.
click here to add your event
Area Events