Wolfwood Refuge provides education and second chances

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Wolfwood Refuge provides education and second chances

Sanctuary has cared for hundreds of wolves in past 20 years
Animals that end up at Wolfwood Refuge have often faced past abuse. Elizabeth Davis, a caretaker with the refuge, gives antibiotics to a wolf-dog to prevent an ear injury from becoming infected.
Wolfwood Refuge provides a safe haven for abused and neglected wolves, coyotes and wolf-dogs near Ignacio. Since Paula Woerner founded it in the late 1990s, she has adopted hundreds of canines for rehabilitation. The refuge also functions as an educational resource to help humans and wildlife coexist. It has been in its current location in Ignacio since 2002.
Wolfwood has about 60 animals, including wolves, wolf-dogs, a coyote and dogs. These two feral dogs get a home-cooked meal rather than traditional dog food. Some animals at the refuge have special dietary restrictions.
Wolves are shy creatures and try to avoid humans as much as possible. At Wolfwood Refuge, volunteers work to socialize the animals to make them feel more comfortable.
K-9s from across the U.S. end up at Wolfwood Refuge near Ignacio. In addition to rehabilitating abused or neglected animals, the refuge works to dispel myths held about the wolf-dogs.

Wolfwood Refuge provides education and second chances

Animals that end up at Wolfwood Refuge have often faced past abuse. Elizabeth Davis, a caretaker with the refuge, gives antibiotics to a wolf-dog to prevent an ear injury from becoming infected.
Wolfwood Refuge provides a safe haven for abused and neglected wolves, coyotes and wolf-dogs near Ignacio. Since Paula Woerner founded it in the late 1990s, she has adopted hundreds of canines for rehabilitation. The refuge also functions as an educational resource to help humans and wildlife coexist. It has been in its current location in Ignacio since 2002.
Wolfwood has about 60 animals, including wolves, wolf-dogs, a coyote and dogs. These two feral dogs get a home-cooked meal rather than traditional dog food. Some animals at the refuge have special dietary restrictions.
Wolves are shy creatures and try to avoid humans as much as possible. At Wolfwood Refuge, volunteers work to socialize the animals to make them feel more comfortable.
K-9s from across the U.S. end up at Wolfwood Refuge near Ignacio. In addition to rehabilitating abused or neglected animals, the refuge works to dispel myths held about the wolf-dogs.
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