China aims to build its own Yellowstone on Tibetan plateau

Southwest Life

China aims to build its own Yellowstone on Tibetan plateau

Peaks reach toward the sky in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. Ringed by the world’s tallest mountain ranges, the region long known as “the rooftop of the world” is now in the crosshairs of China’s latest modernization push. But this time, the Chinese government wants to set limits on the region’s growth in order to implement its own version of one of the U.S.’s proudest legacies – a national park system.
Tibetan women milk their yaks in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. Qinghai is a vast region in western China abutting Tibet and shares much of its cultural legacy.
A Tibetan youth sits at the base of a natural cave formation in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. China has previously undertaken vast resettlement programs to clear land for large infrastructure projects, but in developing the national parks, the government is giving conservation-related jobs to at least a swath of people living in Sanjiangyuan to stay and work on their land.
Clouds hover over the mountainous landscape in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province on Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019. China aims to build its own Yellowstone on the Tibetan plateau.
A-Ta, a Tibetan herder whose income largely comes from raising yaks and collecting caterpillar fungus, places refuse in a bag as he leads his team of trash collectors in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. His team travels as much as 21 miles a day to comb the hillsides for plastic bottles and other waste, as part of the “One Family, One Ranger” program. “I am living in this land, my living is relying on this land,” he says.
A-Ta, at right stands near his father in their home in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. A-Ta, a Tibetan herder whose income largely comes from raising yaks and collecting caterpillar fungus, also leads a team of trash collectors traveling as much as 21 miles a day to comb the hillsides for plastic bottles and other waste, as part of the “One Family, One Ranger” program.
Kunchok Jangtse positions a camera trap in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. The Tibetan herder also has a job installing and maintaining the motion-activated cameras, which help scientists monitor endangered species in the area. “Our religion is connected with wild animals, because wild animals have a consciousness and can feel love and compassion – therefore, we protect wild-animals,” he says.
A Glover’s pika surveys its surrounding in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province.
A sunset casts rays of light over the top of a mountain range in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. “This is one of the most special regions in China, in the world,” says Lu Zhi, a Peking University conservation biologist who has worked in Qinghai for two decades.
A bat flies through a narrow crevice in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A monkey bares its teeth at visitors in an animal shelter that is part of tourist site in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
Women work on a photo for their tea products on a mountain top in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. Zhu Chunquan, the China representative of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, a Switzerland-based scientific group, notes that the country’s economy has boomed over the past 40 years, but priorities are now expanding to include conserving the country’s key natural resources.
Visitors climb Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. The ambition to create a unified park system represents “a new and serious effort to safeguard China’s biodiversity and natural heritage,” says Duke University ecologist Stuart Pimm.
Visitors rest in a pavilion during a climb up Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
Visitors climb Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A visitor poses for a photo on Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A woman poses for photos near a waterfall in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
Tourists ride in bamboo rafts during a tour of the Nine Bends River in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. In August 2019, policymakers and scientists from China, the United States and other countries met in China to discuss the country’s plans to create a unified park system with clear standards for limiting development and protecting ecosystems.
Tourists stand in shallow water along the Nine Bends River in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A boy holds a water rifle on the banks of the Nine Bends River as bamboo raft operators wait for tourists in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. Zhu Chunquan, the China representative of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, a Switzerland-based scientific group, notes that the country’s economy has boomed over the past 40 years. But priorities are now expanding to include conserving the country’s key natural resources.

China aims to build its own Yellowstone on Tibetan plateau

Peaks reach toward the sky in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. Ringed by the world’s tallest mountain ranges, the region long known as “the rooftop of the world” is now in the crosshairs of China’s latest modernization push. But this time, the Chinese government wants to set limits on the region’s growth in order to implement its own version of one of the U.S.’s proudest legacies – a national park system.
Tibetan women milk their yaks in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. Qinghai is a vast region in western China abutting Tibet and shares much of its cultural legacy.
A Tibetan youth sits at the base of a natural cave formation in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. China has previously undertaken vast resettlement programs to clear land for large infrastructure projects, but in developing the national parks, the government is giving conservation-related jobs to at least a swath of people living in Sanjiangyuan to stay and work on their land.
Clouds hover over the mountainous landscape in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province on Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019. China aims to build its own Yellowstone on the Tibetan plateau.
A-Ta, a Tibetan herder whose income largely comes from raising yaks and collecting caterpillar fungus, places refuse in a bag as he leads his team of trash collectors in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. His team travels as much as 21 miles a day to comb the hillsides for plastic bottles and other waste, as part of the “One Family, One Ranger” program. “I am living in this land, my living is relying on this land,” he says.
A-Ta, at right stands near his father in their home in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. A-Ta, a Tibetan herder whose income largely comes from raising yaks and collecting caterpillar fungus, also leads a team of trash collectors traveling as much as 21 miles a day to comb the hillsides for plastic bottles and other waste, as part of the “One Family, One Ranger” program.
Kunchok Jangtse positions a camera trap in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. The Tibetan herder also has a job installing and maintaining the motion-activated cameras, which help scientists monitor endangered species in the area. “Our religion is connected with wild animals, because wild animals have a consciousness and can feel love and compassion – therefore, we protect wild-animals,” he says.
A Glover’s pika surveys its surrounding in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province.
A sunset casts rays of light over the top of a mountain range in Angsai, an area inside the Sanjiangyuan region in western China’s Qinghai province. “This is one of the most special regions in China, in the world,” says Lu Zhi, a Peking University conservation biologist who has worked in Qinghai for two decades.
A bat flies through a narrow crevice in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A monkey bares its teeth at visitors in an animal shelter that is part of tourist site in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
Women work on a photo for their tea products on a mountain top in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. Zhu Chunquan, the China representative of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, a Switzerland-based scientific group, notes that the country’s economy has boomed over the past 40 years, but priorities are now expanding to include conserving the country’s key natural resources.
Visitors climb Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. The ambition to create a unified park system represents “a new and serious effort to safeguard China’s biodiversity and natural heritage,” says Duke University ecologist Stuart Pimm.
Visitors rest in a pavilion during a climb up Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
Visitors climb Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A visitor poses for a photo on Tianyou peak in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A woman poses for photos near a waterfall in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
Tourists ride in bamboo rafts during a tour of the Nine Bends River in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. In August 2019, policymakers and scientists from China, the United States and other countries met in China to discuss the country’s plans to create a unified park system with clear standards for limiting development and protecting ecosystems.
Tourists stand in shallow water along the Nine Bends River in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province.
A boy holds a water rifle on the banks of the Nine Bends River as bamboo raft operators wait for tourists in Wuyishan in eastern China’s Fujian province. Zhu Chunquan, the China representative of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, a Switzerland-based scientific group, notes that the country’s economy has boomed over the past 40 years. But priorities are now expanding to include conserving the country’s key natural resources.
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