Tokyo being billed as ‘Recovery Olympics’

Sports

Tokyo being billed as ‘Recovery Olympics’

Torch relay will kick off in Fukishima
Young baseball players stretch during a festival held to celebrate the city’s hosting of baseball and softball games at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics at the Azuma Baseball Stadium in late November in Fukushima, Fukushima prefecture, Japan.
Weeds grow in an abandoned apartment complex in early December, in Futaba, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Government officials say it’s “recovery Olympics” for the disaster-hit areas and residents. But this town of Futaba, home the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant, is still largely frozen in time for nearly nine years since the disaster, with thousands of its former residents still unable to return to live. The Olympic torch will go around Futaba, which is off the torch map.
A Tokyo 2020 banner stands in front of the Azuma Baseball Stadium, a venue for baseball and softball at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics in late November in Fukushima, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. The torch relay for the Tokyo Olympics will kick off in Fukushima, the northern prefecture devastated almost nine years ago by an earthquake, tsunami and the subsequent meltdown of three nuclear reactors.
Workers chant slogan during a morning gathering outside the Azuma Baseball Stadium, a venue for baseball and softball at the Tokyo 2020 in Fukushima city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan.
A calendar in an abandoned town hall office shows Friday, March 11, the date of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that crippled the nearby Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in late December in Futaba, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. The radiation that spewed from the plant and fell on the neighboring towns have displaced more than 161,000 people from around Fukushima. Nearly nine years after the accident, Futaba is the only one of the dozen Fukushima disaster-hit towns that remains a no-go zone except for daytime visits for decontamination and reconstruction work in designated areas, or by former residents to check their homes.

Tokyo being billed as ‘Recovery Olympics’

Young baseball players stretch during a festival held to celebrate the city’s hosting of baseball and softball games at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics at the Azuma Baseball Stadium in late November in Fukushima, Fukushima prefecture, Japan.
Weeds grow in an abandoned apartment complex in early December, in Futaba, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Government officials say it’s “recovery Olympics” for the disaster-hit areas and residents. But this town of Futaba, home the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant, is still largely frozen in time for nearly nine years since the disaster, with thousands of its former residents still unable to return to live. The Olympic torch will go around Futaba, which is off the torch map.
A Tokyo 2020 banner stands in front of the Azuma Baseball Stadium, a venue for baseball and softball at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics in late November in Fukushima, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. The torch relay for the Tokyo Olympics will kick off in Fukushima, the northern prefecture devastated almost nine years ago by an earthquake, tsunami and the subsequent meltdown of three nuclear reactors.
Workers chant slogan during a morning gathering outside the Azuma Baseball Stadium, a venue for baseball and softball at the Tokyo 2020 in Fukushima city, Fukushima prefecture, Japan.
A calendar in an abandoned town hall office shows Friday, March 11, the date of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that crippled the nearby Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in late December in Futaba, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. The radiation that spewed from the plant and fell on the neighboring towns have displaced more than 161,000 people from around Fukushima. Nearly nine years after the accident, Futaba is the only one of the dozen Fukushima disaster-hit towns that remains a no-go zone except for daytime visits for decontamination and reconstruction work in designated areas, or by former residents to check their homes.
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