Sex, love and food

News

Sex, love and food

Are aphrodisiac foods myth or reality?
The power of the subconscious

Two of humanity’s greatest pleasures, food and sex, seem inexplicably and forever linked. But what is the role of food in a sexual relationship?
Eating together can be a first step toward intimacy. For some, cooking for and feeding a partner can be powerful expressions of nurturing.
“Food helps in establishing a relationship because it teaches the other partner what’s possible or likely in the future – both in a culinary sense and in an economic sense,” said Durango hobby cook Bentley Hamilton. “People want security – they want to know they’re not going to starve.”
When food and sex vie for the pleasure platform, the link may be subconscious.
“Certain foods, like chocolate, release dopamine in the brain. That’s pleasurable,” said retired internist Dr. David Grenoble of Durango. “Pleasure is pleasure.
“The bottom line is the reward center runs through the brain. Eating and sex are both pleasurable,” Grenoble said.
“Eating, the very act of putting something in your mouth, is subconsciously symbolic of the sexual act. Kissing, eating and sex are all related. The mouth is also a sexual organ.”
Grenoble said there’s no doubt that some foods are valued as aphrodisiacs because subconsciously they remind us of and they resemble sexual organs.
Registered dietitian Marissa Kleinsmith agrees, referencing the ancient Aztecs who named the avocado tree “the testicle tree” because the fruit hangs in pairs, conjuring images of male genital anatomy.
A cut fig is said to resemble female sex organs, asparagus resembles a phallus and oysters resemble female genitalia.
Kleinsmith also suggests that the subconscious plays a role in sexual expectation.
“If I have this magic meal, it will lead to something,” Kleinsmith said of the placebo effect.
“Studies show that people will see a positive effect up to 90 percent of the time when they think they’re going to improve, when they believe something will happen,” she said.
Internet-based research on the history of aphrodisiacs indicates that almost any food can be an aphrodisiac, provided the local culture proclaims it to be so.

Sex, love and food

Reader Comments
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events
click here to add your event
Durango ~ Events