For Auschwitz survivor, telling her story is reason to live

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For Auschwitz survivor, telling her story is reason to live

Holocaust survivor Bronia Brandman talks at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York, about losing her parents and all but one sibling after being taken by German soldiers to the Auschwitz concentration camp. After 50 years of remaining silent about her suffering, Brandman now shares her story through the Museum of Jewish Heritage.
Holocaust survivor Bronia Brandman roles up her jacket sleeve at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York to reveal the numbers 52643, which were tattooed on her arm at the age of 12 upon her arrival to the Auschwitz concentration camp. Brandman and her eldest brother, Mendek, were the only members of her immediate family to survive.
Bronia Brandman’s older sister Mila Brandman. The sisters were sent to Auschwitz concentration camp, but Mila eventually contracted typhus and was marked for the gas chamber.
Bronia Brandman at age 7 in her home country of Poland. Brandman, an Auschwitz survivor, says that educating others by telling her story is the driving force in her life 75 years after the liberation of the death camp.
The family home of Holocaust survivor Bronia Brandman in the Market Square of Jaworzno, Poland. Seventy-five years after the liberation of Auschwitz, telling her story is the driving force of Brandman’s life.
Sisters, from left, Mila, Holocaust survivor Bronia, and Rutka. Seventy-five years after the liberation of Auschwitz, telling her story is the driving force of Bronia Brandman’s life.

For Auschwitz survivor, telling her story is reason to live

Holocaust survivor Bronia Brandman talks at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York, about losing her parents and all but one sibling after being taken by German soldiers to the Auschwitz concentration camp. After 50 years of remaining silent about her suffering, Brandman now shares her story through the Museum of Jewish Heritage.
Holocaust survivor Bronia Brandman roles up her jacket sleeve at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York to reveal the numbers 52643, which were tattooed on her arm at the age of 12 upon her arrival to the Auschwitz concentration camp. Brandman and her eldest brother, Mendek, were the only members of her immediate family to survive.
Bronia Brandman’s older sister Mila Brandman. The sisters were sent to Auschwitz concentration camp, but Mila eventually contracted typhus and was marked for the gas chamber.
Bronia Brandman at age 7 in her home country of Poland. Brandman, an Auschwitz survivor, says that educating others by telling her story is the driving force in her life 75 years after the liberation of the death camp.
The family home of Holocaust survivor Bronia Brandman in the Market Square of Jaworzno, Poland. Seventy-five years after the liberation of Auschwitz, telling her story is the driving force of Brandman’s life.
Sisters, from left, Mila, Holocaust survivor Bronia, and Rutka. Seventy-five years after the liberation of Auschwitz, telling her story is the driving force of Bronia Brandman’s life.
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