Sand Creek Massacre site draws indigenous people who pray for victims of genocide worldwide

Southwest Life

Sand Creek Massacre site draws indigenous people who pray for victims of genocide worldwide

An entrance sign to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864. It was one of worst mass murders in U.S. history.
The site that was once home to a Native American village is shown at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864.
Jeff C. Campbell, a volunteer ranger at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads, Colo., speaks about the history of the site. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864. It was one of worst mass murders in U.S. history.
An entrance sign to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864. It was one of worst mass murders in U.S. history.
“Monument Hill” is shown at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864.

Sand Creek Massacre site draws indigenous people who pray for victims of genocide worldwide

An entrance sign to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864. It was one of worst mass murders in U.S. history.
The site that was once home to a Native American village is shown at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864.
Jeff C. Campbell, a volunteer ranger at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads, Colo., speaks about the history of the site. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864. It was one of worst mass murders in U.S. history.
An entrance sign to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864. It was one of worst mass murders in U.S. history.
“Monument Hill” is shown at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. This quiet piece of land tucked away in rural southeastern Colorado seeks to honor the 230 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho tribe members who were slaughtered by the U.S. Army in 1864.
Listen
Loading the English audio player...
If You Go

The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site is located east of Eads, Colorado, about an hour’s drive north of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. To visit the site, follow Colorado State Highway 96 east off Highway 287 near Eads, or west off Highway 385 at Sheridan Lake. Near Chivington, turn north onto County Road 54/Chief White Antelope Way or at Brandon, turn north onto County Road 59.Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Friday.Cost: Free.For more information, visit www.nps.gov/sand/index.htm.

click here to add your event
Area Events