Virus lockdown gives Venice a shot at reimagining tourism

Southwest Life

Virus lockdown gives Venice a shot at reimagining tourism

Gondoliers President Andrea Balbi sails his gondola at the Canal Grande (Grand Canal) in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
People talk to each other on a bridge in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A man wearing a sanitary mask sits in St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A man wearing a sanitary mask walks in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
Venice’s Mayor Luigi Brugnaro talks with The Associated Press in St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
Arrigo Cipriani, owner of Harry’s Bar, talks with The Associated Press in St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A woman wearing a sanitary mask walks at St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
Gondolas are moored at the Canal grande (Grand Canal) in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
A nun wearing a sanitary mask walks along St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
Owner of Saturnia hotel Gianni Serandrei stands as he waits for an Associated Press interview in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
Head of the Venice Hotel Association Claudio Scarpa stands as he waits for an Associated Press interview in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
An operator maneuvers a ferry in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
Keys hang at the reception of the Saturnia hotel, in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
A man wearing a sanitary mask walks his dog in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A woman walks her dog in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
People wearing a sanitary mask wait for a ferry in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A view of the Canal Grande (Grand Canal) in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.

Virus lockdown gives Venice a shot at reimagining tourism

Gondoliers President Andrea Balbi sails his gondola at the Canal Grande (Grand Canal) in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
People talk to each other on a bridge in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A man wearing a sanitary mask sits in St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A man wearing a sanitary mask walks in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
Venice’s Mayor Luigi Brugnaro talks with The Associated Press in St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
Arrigo Cipriani, owner of Harry’s Bar, talks with The Associated Press in St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A woman wearing a sanitary mask walks at St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
Gondolas are moored at the Canal grande (Grand Canal) in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
A nun wearing a sanitary mask walks along St. Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
Owner of Saturnia hotel Gianni Serandrei stands as he waits for an Associated Press interview in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
Head of the Venice Hotel Association Claudio Scarpa stands as he waits for an Associated Press interview in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
An operator maneuvers a ferry in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
Keys hang at the reception of the Saturnia hotel, in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic. For years, the unbridled success of Venice’s tourism industry threatened to ruin the things that made it an attractive destination to begin with. Now the pandemic has ground to a halt Italy’s most-visited city, stopped the flow of $3.2 billion in annual tourism-related revenue and devastated the city’s economy.
A man wearing a sanitary mask walks his dog in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A woman walks her dog in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
People wearing a sanitary mask wait for a ferry in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
A view of the Canal Grande (Grand Canal) in Venice, Italy. Venetians are rethinking their city in the quiet brought by the coronavirus pandemic.
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